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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Workforce Attachment after Ischemic Stroke – The Importance of Time to Thrombolytic Therapy

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Objectives: The ability to remain in employment addresses an important consequence of stroke beyond the usual clinical parameters. However, data on the association between time to intravenous thrombolysis and workforce attachment in patients with acute ischemic stroke are sparse. Materials and methods: In this nationwide cohort study, stroke patients of working age (18-60 years) treated with thrombolysis (2011-2016) who were part of the workforce prior to admission and alive at discharge were identified using the Danish Stroke Registry. The association between time to thrombolysis and workforce attachment one year later was examined with multivariable logistic regression. Results: The study population comprised 1,329 patients (median age 51 years [25th-75th percentile 45-56], 67.3% men). The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at presentation was 4 (25th-75th percentile 2-8), and the median time from symptom-onset to initiation of thrombolysis was 140min (25th-75th percentile 104-196min). The proportion of patients who were part of the workforce at one-year follow-up was 64.6%, 64.3%, 64.9%, and 60.0% in patients receiving thrombolysis within 90min, between 91-180min, between 181-270min, and after 270min, respectively. In adjusted analysis, time to thrombolysis between 91-180min, 181-270min, and >270min was not significantly associated with workforce attachment compared with thrombolysis received ≤90min of symptom-onset (ORs 0.89 [95%CI 0.60-1.31], 0.93 [0.66-1.31], and 0.80 [0.43-1.52], respectively). Conclusions: In patients of working age admitted with stroke and treated with thrombolysis, two out of three were part of the workforce one year after discharge. There was no graded relationship between time to thrombolysis and the likelihood of workforce attachment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106031
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume30
Issue number11
ISSN1052-3057
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

    Research areas

  • Epidemiology, Stroke, Thrombolytic therapy, Workforce

ID: 67447801