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WHO grade I meningiomas: classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival

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Harvard

Lemée, J-M, Joswig, H, Da Broi, M, Corniola, MV, Scheie, D, Schaller, K, Helseth, E & Meling, TR 2020, 'WHO grade I meningiomas: classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 749-758. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0

APA

Lemée, J-M., Joswig, H., Da Broi, M., Corniola, M. V., Scheie, D., Schaller, K., Helseth, E., & Meling, T. R. (2020). WHO grade I meningiomas: classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival. Journal of Neurosurgery, 43(2), 749-758. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0

CBE

Lemée J-M, Joswig H, Da Broi M, Corniola MV, Scheie D, Schaller K, Helseth E, Meling TR. 2020. WHO grade I meningiomas: classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival. Journal of Neurosurgery. 43(2):749-758. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Lemée, Jean-Michel ; Joswig, Holger ; Da Broi, Michele ; Corniola, Marco Vincenzo ; Scheie, David ; Schaller, Karl ; Helseth, Eirik ; Meling, Torstein R. / WHO grade I meningiomas : classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2020 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 749-758.

Bibtex

@article{35bcf4bcc620457a94db8da6f32ecf9f,
title = "WHO grade I meningiomas: classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival",
abstract = "World Health Organization (WHO) grade I meningiomas are intracranial extracerebral tumors, in which microsurgery as a stand-alone therapy provides high rates of disease control and low recurrence rates. Our aim was to identify prognostic factors of overall survival and time-to-retreat (OS; TTR) in a cohort of patients with surgically managed WHO grade I meningioma. Patients with WHO grade I meningiomas from a retrospectively (1990 to 2002) and prospectively managed (2003 to 2010) databank of Oslo University Hospital, Norway, were included. The mean follow-up was 9.2 ± 5.7 years, with a total of 11,414 patient-years. One thousand three hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 58 ± 13.2, mean Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) 92.6 ± 26.1 and female-to-male ratio 2.5:1. The 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year, and 20-year probabilities were 0.98, 0.91, 0.87, 0.84, and 0.8 for TTR. Patient age (OR 0.92 [0.91, 0.94]), male sex (OR 0.59 [0.45, 0.76]), preoperative KPS ≥ 70 (OR 2.22 [1.59, 3.13]), skull base location (OR 0.77 [0.60, 1]), and the occurrence of a postoperative hematoma (OR 0.44 [0.26, 0.76]) were identified as independent prognostic factors of OS. Patient age (OR 1.02 [1.01, 1.03]) and skull base location (OR 0.30 [0.21, 0.45]) were independent predictors of decreased PFS. Using a recursive partitioning analysis, we suggest a classification tree for the prediction of 5-year PFS based on patient and tumor characteristics. The findings from this cohort of meningioma WHO I patients helps to identify patients at risk of recurrence and tailor the therapeutic management.",
keywords = "Meningioma, Overall survival, Prognostic factors, Time-to-retreat, WHO grade I",
author = "Jean-Michel Lem{\'e}e and Holger Joswig and {Da Broi}, Michele and Corniola, {Marco Vincenzo} and David Scheie and Karl Schaller and Eirik Helseth and Meling, {Torstein R}",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "749--758",
journal = "Journal of Neurosurgery",
issn = "0022-3085",
publisher = "American Association of Neurological Surgeons",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - WHO grade I meningiomas

T2 - classification-tree for prognostic factors of survival

AU - Lemée, Jean-Michel

AU - Joswig, Holger

AU - Da Broi, Michele

AU - Corniola, Marco Vincenzo

AU - Scheie, David

AU - Schaller, Karl

AU - Helseth, Eirik

AU - Meling, Torstein R

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - World Health Organization (WHO) grade I meningiomas are intracranial extracerebral tumors, in which microsurgery as a stand-alone therapy provides high rates of disease control and low recurrence rates. Our aim was to identify prognostic factors of overall survival and time-to-retreat (OS; TTR) in a cohort of patients with surgically managed WHO grade I meningioma. Patients with WHO grade I meningiomas from a retrospectively (1990 to 2002) and prospectively managed (2003 to 2010) databank of Oslo University Hospital, Norway, were included. The mean follow-up was 9.2 ± 5.7 years, with a total of 11,414 patient-years. One thousand three hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 58 ± 13.2, mean Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) 92.6 ± 26.1 and female-to-male ratio 2.5:1. The 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year, and 20-year probabilities were 0.98, 0.91, 0.87, 0.84, and 0.8 for TTR. Patient age (OR 0.92 [0.91, 0.94]), male sex (OR 0.59 [0.45, 0.76]), preoperative KPS ≥ 70 (OR 2.22 [1.59, 3.13]), skull base location (OR 0.77 [0.60, 1]), and the occurrence of a postoperative hematoma (OR 0.44 [0.26, 0.76]) were identified as independent prognostic factors of OS. Patient age (OR 1.02 [1.01, 1.03]) and skull base location (OR 0.30 [0.21, 0.45]) were independent predictors of decreased PFS. Using a recursive partitioning analysis, we suggest a classification tree for the prediction of 5-year PFS based on patient and tumor characteristics. The findings from this cohort of meningioma WHO I patients helps to identify patients at risk of recurrence and tailor the therapeutic management.

AB - World Health Organization (WHO) grade I meningiomas are intracranial extracerebral tumors, in which microsurgery as a stand-alone therapy provides high rates of disease control and low recurrence rates. Our aim was to identify prognostic factors of overall survival and time-to-retreat (OS; TTR) in a cohort of patients with surgically managed WHO grade I meningioma. Patients with WHO grade I meningiomas from a retrospectively (1990 to 2002) and prospectively managed (2003 to 2010) databank of Oslo University Hospital, Norway, were included. The mean follow-up was 9.2 ± 5.7 years, with a total of 11,414 patient-years. One thousand three hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 58 ± 13.2, mean Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) 92.6 ± 26.1 and female-to-male ratio 2.5:1. The 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year, and 20-year probabilities were 0.98, 0.91, 0.87, 0.84, and 0.8 for TTR. Patient age (OR 0.92 [0.91, 0.94]), male sex (OR 0.59 [0.45, 0.76]), preoperative KPS ≥ 70 (OR 2.22 [1.59, 3.13]), skull base location (OR 0.77 [0.60, 1]), and the occurrence of a postoperative hematoma (OR 0.44 [0.26, 0.76]) were identified as independent prognostic factors of OS. Patient age (OR 1.02 [1.01, 1.03]) and skull base location (OR 0.30 [0.21, 0.45]) were independent predictors of decreased PFS. Using a recursive partitioning analysis, we suggest a classification tree for the prediction of 5-year PFS based on patient and tumor characteristics. The findings from this cohort of meningioma WHO I patients helps to identify patients at risk of recurrence and tailor the therapeutic management.

KW - Meningioma

KW - Overall survival

KW - Prognostic factors

KW - Time-to-retreat

KW - WHO grade I

U2 - 10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0

DO - 10.1007/s10143-019-01117-0

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31183587

VL - 43

SP - 749

EP - 758

JO - Journal of Neurosurgery

JF - Journal of Neurosurgery

SN - 0022-3085

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 59039543