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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Using assessment criteria for pesticides to evaluate the endocrine disrupting potential of non-pesticide chemicals: Case butylparaben

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Regulation of chemicals with endocrine disrupting properties depend on the use of the chemical rather than its intrinsic properties. Within the EU, the only criteria currently in place for identifying an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) are those developed for biocidal and plant protection products. We argue that ECHA/EFSA guidance for assessing endocrine disrupting properties of biocidal and plant protection products can be applied to all chemicals independent of their intended use. We have assessed the REACH-registered compound butylparaben (CAS 94-36-8), a preservative used primarily in cosmetics. Based on scientific evidence of adverse reproductive effects and endocrine activity, the open literature suggest that butylparaben is an EDC. By applying the ECHA/EFSA guidance for pesticides and biocides, we identify butylparaben as a compound with endocrine disrupting properties. Even though available data is markedly different from that for biocides and pesticides, it was possible to reach this conclusion. More generally, we propose that the ECHA/EFSA guidance can and should be used for identification of EDC regardless of their intended application.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironment International
Volume144
Pages (from-to)105996
ISSN0160-4120
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020

    Research areas

  • Butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, EDC, Endocrine disruptors, Parabens, Risk assessment, Test guideline

ID: 60688301