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Use of simulation-based training of surgical technical skills among ENTs: an international YO-IFOS survey

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@article{52ae274669bc429c8742aaec0a6b883f,
title = "Use of simulation-based training of surgical technical skills among ENTs: an international YO-IFOS survey",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the use of simulation-based technical skills training (SBTST) in the otolaryngology curriculum in different countries, and to explore the needs and opinions about the use of simulation among young otolaryngologists.METHODS: An e-survey conducted among Young Otolaryngologists of the International Federation of Oto-rhino-laryngological Societies (Yo-IFOS) members.RESULTS: 139 Yo-IFOS members from 51 countries completed the survey. During residency training, 82.7% of respondents have used SBTST on cadavers, 51.8% on physical simulators, and 43.8% on virtual reality simulators. High costs (65.5%), lack of availability (49.2%) and lack of time (25.5%) were the main barriers limiting the practice of SBTST. These barriers also limited teaching using simulation. Sinonasal surgery (72.7%), temporal bone surgery (67.6%), and head/neck surgery (44.6%) were significantly more frequently taught using SBTST than suspension microlaryngoscopy (25.9%) and pediatric surgery (22.3%) (p < 0.001). The procedures rated as the most important to learn through SBTST were tracheotomy (50.4%), emergency cricothyroidotomy (48.9%), and rigid bronchoscopy (47.5%). On an analogic visual scale (0-100) for the question {"}how important will simulation be for future ENTs in surgical training?{"}, the mean score was 79.5/100 (± 23.3), highlighting the positive attitude toward the use of SBTST in otorhinolaryngology training.CONCLUSION: SBTST is an attractive learning and teaching method in otorhinolaryngology, but associated costs, lack of access, and lack of time are the main barriers limiting its use. Emergency procedures are key technical skills to be learned using simulation but in some cases, lack relevant simulators for training.",
keywords = "Curriculum, Ear surgery, Endoscopic endonasal surgery, ENT pediatric surgery, Head and neck surgery, Simulation",
author = "Valentin Favier and Tareck Ayad and Fabian Blanc and Nicolas Fakhry and Andersen, {Steven Arild Wuyts}",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1007/s00405-021-06846-x",
language = "English",
volume = "278",
pages = "5043--5050",
journal = "Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ohren- Nasen- und Kehlkopfheilkunde",
issn = "0003-9195",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of simulation-based training of surgical technical skills among ENTs

T2 - an international YO-IFOS survey

AU - Favier, Valentin

AU - Ayad, Tareck

AU - Blanc, Fabian

AU - Fakhry, Nicolas

AU - Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

PY - 2021/12

Y1 - 2021/12

N2 - PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the use of simulation-based technical skills training (SBTST) in the otolaryngology curriculum in different countries, and to explore the needs and opinions about the use of simulation among young otolaryngologists.METHODS: An e-survey conducted among Young Otolaryngologists of the International Federation of Oto-rhino-laryngological Societies (Yo-IFOS) members.RESULTS: 139 Yo-IFOS members from 51 countries completed the survey. During residency training, 82.7% of respondents have used SBTST on cadavers, 51.8% on physical simulators, and 43.8% on virtual reality simulators. High costs (65.5%), lack of availability (49.2%) and lack of time (25.5%) were the main barriers limiting the practice of SBTST. These barriers also limited teaching using simulation. Sinonasal surgery (72.7%), temporal bone surgery (67.6%), and head/neck surgery (44.6%) were significantly more frequently taught using SBTST than suspension microlaryngoscopy (25.9%) and pediatric surgery (22.3%) (p < 0.001). The procedures rated as the most important to learn through SBTST were tracheotomy (50.4%), emergency cricothyroidotomy (48.9%), and rigid bronchoscopy (47.5%). On an analogic visual scale (0-100) for the question "how important will simulation be for future ENTs in surgical training?", the mean score was 79.5/100 (± 23.3), highlighting the positive attitude toward the use of SBTST in otorhinolaryngology training.CONCLUSION: SBTST is an attractive learning and teaching method in otorhinolaryngology, but associated costs, lack of access, and lack of time are the main barriers limiting its use. Emergency procedures are key technical skills to be learned using simulation but in some cases, lack relevant simulators for training.

AB - PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the use of simulation-based technical skills training (SBTST) in the otolaryngology curriculum in different countries, and to explore the needs and opinions about the use of simulation among young otolaryngologists.METHODS: An e-survey conducted among Young Otolaryngologists of the International Federation of Oto-rhino-laryngological Societies (Yo-IFOS) members.RESULTS: 139 Yo-IFOS members from 51 countries completed the survey. During residency training, 82.7% of respondents have used SBTST on cadavers, 51.8% on physical simulators, and 43.8% on virtual reality simulators. High costs (65.5%), lack of availability (49.2%) and lack of time (25.5%) were the main barriers limiting the practice of SBTST. These barriers also limited teaching using simulation. Sinonasal surgery (72.7%), temporal bone surgery (67.6%), and head/neck surgery (44.6%) were significantly more frequently taught using SBTST than suspension microlaryngoscopy (25.9%) and pediatric surgery (22.3%) (p < 0.001). The procedures rated as the most important to learn through SBTST were tracheotomy (50.4%), emergency cricothyroidotomy (48.9%), and rigid bronchoscopy (47.5%). On an analogic visual scale (0-100) for the question "how important will simulation be for future ENTs in surgical training?", the mean score was 79.5/100 (± 23.3), highlighting the positive attitude toward the use of SBTST in otorhinolaryngology training.CONCLUSION: SBTST is an attractive learning and teaching method in otorhinolaryngology, but associated costs, lack of access, and lack of time are the main barriers limiting its use. Emergency procedures are key technical skills to be learned using simulation but in some cases, lack relevant simulators for training.

KW - Curriculum

KW - Ear surgery

KW - Endoscopic endonasal surgery

KW - ENT pediatric surgery

KW - Head and neck surgery

KW - Simulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85105503812&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00405-021-06846-x

DO - 10.1007/s00405-021-06846-x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33914149

VL - 278

SP - 5043

EP - 5050

JO - Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ohren- Nasen- und Kehlkopfheilkunde

JF - Archiv fur klinische und experimentelle Ohren- Nasen- und Kehlkopfheilkunde

SN - 0003-9195

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 65442898