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Understanding the link between obesity and headache- with focus on migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

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@article{0e45c6f7c4804e9f86484bcf73c51c0c,
title = "Understanding the link between obesity and headache- with focus on migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Obesity confers adverse effects to every system in the body including the central nervous system. Obesity is associated with both migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and these headache diseases remain unclear.METHODS: We conducted a narrative review of the evidence in both humans and rodents, for the putative mechanisms underlying the link between obesity, migraine and IIH.RESULTS: Truncal adiposity, a key feature of obesity, is associated with increased migraine morbidity and disability through increased headache severity, frequency and more severe cutaneous allodynia. Obesity may also increase intracranial pressure and could contribute to headache morbidity in migraine and be causative in IIH headache. Weight loss can improve both migraine and IIH headache. Preclinical research highlights that obesity increases the sensitivity of the trigeminovascular system to noxious stimuli including inflammatory stimuli, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated.CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights that at the epidemiological and clinical level, obesity increases morbidity in migraine and IIH headache, where weight loss can improve headache morbidity. However, further research is required to understand the molecular underpinnings of obesity related headache in order to generate novel treatments.",
keywords = "Headache, Humans, Intracranial Pressure, Migraine Disorders/complications, Obesity/complications, Pseudotumor Cerebri/complications",
author = "Westgate, {Connar Stanley James} and Israelsen, {Ida Marchen Egerod} and Jensen, {Rigmor H{\o}jland} and Sajedeh Eftekhari",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021. The Author(s).",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1186/s10194-021-01337-0",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "The Journal of Headache and Pain Online",
issn = "1129-2377",
publisher = "SpringerOpen",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding the link between obesity and headache- with focus on migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

AU - Westgate, Connar Stanley James

AU - Israelsen, Ida Marchen Egerod

AU - Jensen, Rigmor Højland

AU - Eftekhari, Sajedeh

N1 - © 2021. The Author(s).

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity confers adverse effects to every system in the body including the central nervous system. Obesity is associated with both migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and these headache diseases remain unclear.METHODS: We conducted a narrative review of the evidence in both humans and rodents, for the putative mechanisms underlying the link between obesity, migraine and IIH.RESULTS: Truncal adiposity, a key feature of obesity, is associated with increased migraine morbidity and disability through increased headache severity, frequency and more severe cutaneous allodynia. Obesity may also increase intracranial pressure and could contribute to headache morbidity in migraine and be causative in IIH headache. Weight loss can improve both migraine and IIH headache. Preclinical research highlights that obesity increases the sensitivity of the trigeminovascular system to noxious stimuli including inflammatory stimuli, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated.CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights that at the epidemiological and clinical level, obesity increases morbidity in migraine and IIH headache, where weight loss can improve headache morbidity. However, further research is required to understand the molecular underpinnings of obesity related headache in order to generate novel treatments.

AB - BACKGROUND: Obesity confers adverse effects to every system in the body including the central nervous system. Obesity is associated with both migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and these headache diseases remain unclear.METHODS: We conducted a narrative review of the evidence in both humans and rodents, for the putative mechanisms underlying the link between obesity, migraine and IIH.RESULTS: Truncal adiposity, a key feature of obesity, is associated with increased migraine morbidity and disability through increased headache severity, frequency and more severe cutaneous allodynia. Obesity may also increase intracranial pressure and could contribute to headache morbidity in migraine and be causative in IIH headache. Weight loss can improve both migraine and IIH headache. Preclinical research highlights that obesity increases the sensitivity of the trigeminovascular system to noxious stimuli including inflammatory stimuli, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated.CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights that at the epidemiological and clinical level, obesity increases morbidity in migraine and IIH headache, where weight loss can improve headache morbidity. However, further research is required to understand the molecular underpinnings of obesity related headache in order to generate novel treatments.

KW - Headache

KW - Humans

KW - Intracranial Pressure

KW - Migraine Disorders/complications

KW - Obesity/complications

KW - Pseudotumor Cerebri/complications

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85116733816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s10194-021-01337-0

DO - 10.1186/s10194-021-01337-0

M3 - Review

C2 - 34629054

VL - 22

JO - The Journal of Headache and Pain Online

JF - The Journal of Headache and Pain Online

SN - 1129-2377

IS - 1

M1 - 123

ER -

ID: 68392068