Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Topiramate is more effective than acetazolamide at lowering intracranial pressure

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. CGRP-dependent signalling pathways involved in mouse models of GTN- cilostazol- and levcromakalim-induced migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Naratriptan is as effective as sumatriptan for the treatment of migraine attacks when used properly. A mini-review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Poor social support and loneliness in chronic headache: Prevalence and effect modifiers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Intranasal ketamine for acute cluster headache attacks-Results from a proof-of-concept open-label trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Paracetamol use during pregnancy - a call for precautionary action

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Poor social support and loneliness in chronic headache: Prevalence and effect modifiers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Health-related quality of life in tension-type headache: a population-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Guidelines of the International Headache Society for clinical trials with neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: The management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension focuses on reducing intracranial pressure to preserve vision and reduce headaches. There is sparse evidence to support the use of some of the drugs commonly used to manage idiopathic intracranial hypertension, therefore we propose to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs at lowering intracranial pressure in healthy rats.

METHODS: We measured intracranial pressure in female rats before and after subcutaneous administration of acetazolamide, topiramate, furosemide, amiloride and octreotide at clinical doses (equivalent to a single human dose) and high doses (equivalent to a human daily dose). In addition, we measured intracranial pressure after oral administration of acetazolamide and topiramate.

RESULTS: At clinical and high doses, subcutaneous administration of topiramate lowered intracranial pressure by 32% ( p = 0.0009) and 21% ( p = 0.015) respectively. There was no significant reduction in intracranial pressure noted with acetazolamide, furosemide, amiloride or octreotide at any dose. Oral administration of topiramate significantly lowered intracranial pressure by 22% ( p = 0.018), compared to 5% reduction with acetazolamide ( p = >0.999).

CONCLUSION: Our in vivo studies demonstrated that both subcutaneous and oral administration of topiramate significantly lowers intracranial pressure. Other drugs tested, including acetazolamide, did not significantly reduce intracranial pressure. Future clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and side effects of topiramate in idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients would be of interest.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCephalalgia : an international journal of headache
Volume39
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)209-218
Number of pages10
ISSN0333-1024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

    Research areas

  • Cerebrospinal fluid, choroid plexus, headache, idiopathic intracranial hypertension

ID: 56704062