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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The significance of subdivisions of microscopically positive (R1) margins in colorectal cancer: A retrospective study of a national cancer registry

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AIM: Microscopically positive (R1) margins are associated with poorer outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. However, little is known of the differential impact of subdivisions of R1 margins, be they to the primary tumour (R1tumour) or to lymph node metastases/tumour deposits (R1LNM).

METHODS: Patients treated for Stage III colorectal cancer from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2019 were identified from the Danish national cancer registry. Patients were stratified into three groups according to margin status (R0 vs. R1tumour vs. R1LNM). The primary outcome was overall survival.

RESULTS: In all, 4186 patients were included, comprising 3012 patients with colon cancer and 1174 patients with rectal cancer. The R1 resection rates were 16.5% and 18.2% in patients with colon and rectum cancer, respectively. In colon cancers, 3-year overall survival was reduced in patients with R1LNM (65.7%, 95% CI 62.8-68.6) or R1tumour margins (51.8%, 95% CI 47.3-56.3) compared with R0 resections (80.8%, 95% CI 79.9-81.6, P < 0.001). A similar impact on survival was seen in rectal cancers (R0, 84.2%, 95% CI 82.9-85.5; R1LNM, 72.2%, 95% CI 67.8-76.6; R1tumour, 56.6%, 95% CI 50.0-63.2, P < 0.001). Margin status was independently prognostic of survival in both colon (R1tumour, hazard ratio 2.08, 95% CI 1.50-2.89, P < 0.001; R1LNM, hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.97, P = 0.008) and rectal cancers (R1tumour, hazard ratio 2.35, 95% CI 1.42-3.90, P < 0.001; R1LNM, hazard ratio 1.54, 95% CI 0.95-2.48, P = 0.077).

CONCLUSION: R1 subdivisions have distinct impacts on survival in Stage III colorectal cancer. Further focused research in these patient subgroups is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
JournalColorectal Disease
Volume24
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)197-209
Number of pages13
ISSN1462-8910
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2021 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

    Research areas

  • colon cancer, R1 resection margins, rectal cancer

ID: 74912609