Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The role of body mass index in incidence and persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Fever in pregnancy and offspring head circumference

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. No impact of surgery on cognitive function: a longitudinal study of middle-aged Danish twins

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. No changes in serum tryptase after bariatric surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Human papillomavirus genotype-specific risks for cervical intraepithelial lesions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Expanding our understanding of ovarian cancer risk: the role of incomplete pregnancies

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Borderline ovarian tumors in Denmark 1997-2018: Time trends in incidence by histology, age and educational level

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Low-dose aspirin use and risk of head and neck cancer-A Danish nationwide case-control study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Endometrial cancer risk after fertility treatment: a population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the association between body mass index and incident or persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection.

METHODS: This cohort study included 6809 women from the general Danish population who participated in two clinical visits (in 1991-1993 and in 1993-1995). Height and weight were measured by nurses, lifestyle data were obtained by structured interviews, and cervical cytology samples were obtained for hrHPV DNA testing. We conducted log-binomial regression to estimate risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident and type-specific persistent hrHPV infection according to body mass index, adjusting for age, education, smoking, and the number of sexual partners in the past year.

RESULTS: We found no increased risk of incident hrHPV infection in women who were underweight (RRadjusted, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.64-1.48), overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.82-1.17), or obese (RRadjusted, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.36) compared with women of normal weight. The risk of hrHPV persistence was similar in overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.71-1.34) and obese (RRadjusted, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.56-1.79) women compared with women of normal weight, whereas underweight women had a lower risk (RRadjusted, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.95).

CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity were not associated with HPV incidence or persistence when adjusting for sexual behavior.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume49
Pages (from-to)36-41
Number of pages6
ISSN1047-2797
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

    Research areas

  • Adult, Body Mass Index, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/diagnosis, Cervix Uteri/virology, Cohort Studies, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Incidence, Mass Screening, Obesity/epidemiology, Overweight/complications, Papillomaviridae/genetics, Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis, Population Surveillance, Thinness/epidemiology, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis

ID: 61555902