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The effects of individually tailored nurse navigation for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer: a randomized pilot study

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@article{e0a5635286f245efa6f7877e4a891d49,
title = "The effects of individually tailored nurse navigation for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer: a randomized pilot study",
abstract = "AIM: Our aim was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an individual, nurse-navigator intervention for relieving distress, anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life in women who have been treated for breast cancer (BC) and are experiencing moderate-to-severe psychological and physical symptoms.METHODS: Fifty women with newly diagnosed BC who reported distress (score ≥7 on distress thermometer) before surgery were included consecutively in a pilot study and randomized 1:1 to the intervention or the control group. The intervention comprised repeated screening with patient reported outcome measures and nurse navigation. A total of 66 women who were not distressed (score <7) were followed longitudinally as an observational group. Participants filled in four questionnaires, at baseline, after 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome was psychological distress and the secondary outcomes were anxiety, depression, health-related quality of life and feasibility of the intervention.RESULTS: Women in the intervention group reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and rehabilitation and lower levels of distress (mean 2.7 vs. 5.1, p<.01), anxiety (mean 5.1 vs. 7.8, p = .02) and depression (mean 2.2 vs. 4.4, p = .04) after 12 months compared to the control group. No significant effects were seen on health-related quality of life.CONCLUSIONS: The study shows promising feasibility of the individually tailored nurse-navigation intervention and while no significant effects were observed after 6 months, we did find statistically significant effects on distress, anxiety and depression 12 months after diagnosis. Our results will assist in developing rehabilitation to the most vulnerable patients.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Mertz, {Birgitte Goldschmidt} and Dunn-Henriksen, {Anne Katrine} and Niels Kroman and Christoffer Johansen and Andersen, {Kenneth Geving} and Michael Andersson and Mathiesen, {Ulla Breitenstein} and Jette Vibe-Petersen and Dalton, {Susanne Oksbjerg} and {Envold Bidstrup}, Pernille",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1080/0284186X.2017.1358462",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "1682--1689",
journal = "Acta Oncologica",
issn = "0284-186X",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of individually tailored nurse navigation for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer

T2 - a randomized pilot study

AU - Mertz, Birgitte Goldschmidt

AU - Dunn-Henriksen, Anne Katrine

AU - Kroman, Niels

AU - Johansen, Christoffer

AU - Andersen, Kenneth Geving

AU - Andersson, Michael

AU - Mathiesen, Ulla Breitenstein

AU - Vibe-Petersen, Jette

AU - Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

AU - Envold Bidstrup, Pernille

PY - 2017/12

Y1 - 2017/12

N2 - AIM: Our aim was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an individual, nurse-navigator intervention for relieving distress, anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life in women who have been treated for breast cancer (BC) and are experiencing moderate-to-severe psychological and physical symptoms.METHODS: Fifty women with newly diagnosed BC who reported distress (score ≥7 on distress thermometer) before surgery were included consecutively in a pilot study and randomized 1:1 to the intervention or the control group. The intervention comprised repeated screening with patient reported outcome measures and nurse navigation. A total of 66 women who were not distressed (score <7) were followed longitudinally as an observational group. Participants filled in four questionnaires, at baseline, after 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome was psychological distress and the secondary outcomes were anxiety, depression, health-related quality of life and feasibility of the intervention.RESULTS: Women in the intervention group reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and rehabilitation and lower levels of distress (mean 2.7 vs. 5.1, p<.01), anxiety (mean 5.1 vs. 7.8, p = .02) and depression (mean 2.2 vs. 4.4, p = .04) after 12 months compared to the control group. No significant effects were seen on health-related quality of life.CONCLUSIONS: The study shows promising feasibility of the individually tailored nurse-navigation intervention and while no significant effects were observed after 6 months, we did find statistically significant effects on distress, anxiety and depression 12 months after diagnosis. Our results will assist in developing rehabilitation to the most vulnerable patients.

AB - AIM: Our aim was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an individual, nurse-navigator intervention for relieving distress, anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life in women who have been treated for breast cancer (BC) and are experiencing moderate-to-severe psychological and physical symptoms.METHODS: Fifty women with newly diagnosed BC who reported distress (score ≥7 on distress thermometer) before surgery were included consecutively in a pilot study and randomized 1:1 to the intervention or the control group. The intervention comprised repeated screening with patient reported outcome measures and nurse navigation. A total of 66 women who were not distressed (score <7) were followed longitudinally as an observational group. Participants filled in four questionnaires, at baseline, after 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome was psychological distress and the secondary outcomes were anxiety, depression, health-related quality of life and feasibility of the intervention.RESULTS: Women in the intervention group reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and rehabilitation and lower levels of distress (mean 2.7 vs. 5.1, p<.01), anxiety (mean 5.1 vs. 7.8, p = .02) and depression (mean 2.2 vs. 4.4, p = .04) after 12 months compared to the control group. No significant effects were seen on health-related quality of life.CONCLUSIONS: The study shows promising feasibility of the individually tailored nurse-navigation intervention and while no significant effects were observed after 6 months, we did find statistically significant effects on distress, anxiety and depression 12 months after diagnosis. Our results will assist in developing rehabilitation to the most vulnerable patients.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1080/0284186X.2017.1358462

DO - 10.1080/0284186X.2017.1358462

M3 - Journal article

VL - 56

SP - 1682

EP - 1689

JO - Acta Oncologica

JF - Acta Oncologica

SN - 0284-186X

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 51782558