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Socioeconomic status in Danish transgender persons: a nationwide register-based cohort study

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Background: Gender dysphoria could be associated with low socioeconomic status (SES). SES could be modified by age, ethnic background, and medical morbidity.

Aim: To determine SES in a national study population including transgender persons in Denmark.

Methods: National register-based cohort study in Danish transgender persons and age-matched controls. The transgender study cohort included persons with ICD-10 diagnosis code of 'gender identity disorder' and/or persons with legal sex change and persons who fulfiled the inclusion criteria during 2000-2018. The main outcome measure was SES including personal income, occupational status, and education.

Results: The cohort included 2770 transgender persons and 27,700 controls. In the transgender study cohort, 1437 were assigned male at birth (AMAB), median age (interquartile range, IQR) 26.0 (17.3) years, and 1333 were assigned female at birth (AFAB), median age 22.5 (10.3) years. Adjusting for age and sex, the relative risk ratio (RRR) of low vs high personal income was 5.6 (95% CI: 4.9; 6.3) in transgender persons compared to controls. The RRR of low vs high income was 6.9 (5.8; 8.3) in persons AMAB compared to control males and 4.7 (3.9; 5.6) in persons AFAB compared to control females. The RRR of low vs high income was 3.7 (3.2; 4.3) in transgender persons of Danish origin compared to controls. The Charlson comorbidity index was comparable in transgender persons vs controls.

Conclusions: Being transgender was negatively associated with SES. In transgender persons, the risk of low vs high income could be more pronounced in transgender persons of foreign origin.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEndocrine Connections
Volume10
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)1155-1166
Number of pages12
ISSN2049-3614
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Sep 2021

ID: 72963111