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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Skull base versus non-skull base meningioma surgery in the elderly

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To compare outcomes after surgery for skull base meningiomas (SBMs) with non-skull base meningiomas (NSBMs) in the elderly. Overall, 128 consecutive patients ≥ 70 years of age with intracranial SBMs operated between 1990 and 2010 were compared to 193 consecutive patients ≥ 70 years of age with NSBMs operated within the same time period. Median age at surgery was 75.0 years (mean 75.7, range 70.0-92.4). Follow-up was complete with median 4.7 years (mean 5.5, range 0-19). The female-to-male ratio was 2.8 for SBMs and 1.3 for NSBMs (p < 0.005). The groups had similar preoperative KPS (median 80, range 20-100), but SBMs presented significantly more frequently with raised ICP (RR = 2.2, p < 0.005) and less frequently with seizures (RR = 0.6, p < 0.05). WHO I was significantly more frequent in SBMs (p < 0.005). Gross-total resection (GTR) was less frequent in SBMs (63 vs 82%) (RR = 2.1, p < 0.0001). SBMs were similar to NSBMs with respect to neurological outcome at 6-12 months, reoperations for hematomas, postoperative infections, and 30-day mortality. Retreatment rates and time to retreatments were also similar. There were no differences between the two groups with respect to risk of retreatment and overall survival (OS) at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years. In elderly patients with SBMs selected to surgical treatment, the risks of surgery, risk of retreatment, and OS were similar to NBSMs. Therefore, surgery for SBMs may be considered as safe as NSBMs in the elderly population.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume42
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)961-972
Number of pages12
ISSN0022-3085
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

    Research areas

  • Craniotomy, Intracranial tumor, Meningioma, Overall survival, Retreatment-free survival

ID: 56537530