Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Self-Collected versus Healthcare Worker-Collected Swabs in the Diagnosis of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Preoperative Embolization of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor Originating from External Auditory Meatus: A Case Report with Literature Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Limited diagnostic utility of Chromogranin A measurements in workup of neuroendocrine tumors

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Gastrointestinal Applications of Iodine Quantification Using Dual-Energy CT: A Systematic Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  4. Renal 123I-MIBG Uptake before and after Live-Donor Kidney Transplantation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Enlargement in Well-Treated Persons With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. TORS Base-of-Tongue Mucosectomy in Human Papilloma Virus-Negative Carcinoma of Unknown Primary

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Penetrating Orbital Sphenoid Sinus Trauma with a Wooden Stick: A Challenging Case Report

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of self-collected versus healthcare worker (HCW)-collected swabs for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing. Symptomatic individuals referred for SARS-CoV-2 testing were invited to provide mobile-phone video-instructed self-collected oropharyngeal and nasal samples followed by a HCW-collected oropharyngeal sample. All samples were sent for analysis to the same microbiology laboratory, and the number of SARS-CoV-2-positive participants in the two tests was compared. A total of 109 participants were included, and 19 participants had SARS-CoV-2-positive results. The diagnostic sensitivity of the self-collected and HCW-collected swabs was 84.2% and 89.5%, respectively, with an acceptable agreement, Cohens kappa 0.82, p < 0.001. Further, results from a questionnaire answered by the participants found that loss of smell as a self-reported symptom was a strong predictor for a SARS-CoV-2-positive test. In conclusion, we found that self-collected oropharyngeal and nasal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 testing can be reliable compared to HCW-collected oropharyngeal samples.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiagnostics
Volume10
Issue number9
ISSN2075-4418
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Sep 2020

ID: 61231121