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Reposition Chair Treatment Improves Subjective Outcomes in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

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@article{6124e063a4354390ac088f2fd35234fb,
title = "Reposition Chair Treatment Improves Subjective Outcomes in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Despite increasing utilization of reposition devices in the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), knowledge on subjective outcomes is insufficient. The objective of the present study was to evaluate subjective vertigo complaints and vertigo-associated emotional distress during reposition chair management for refractory BPPV.MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study of subjective and objective data of 31 patients suffering from refractory BPPV representing failed conventional repositioning treatment. At the beginning of each visit, the patients filled out the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Treatment and re-evaluation were repeated every 2 weeks until the patient was declared disease-free.RESULTS: Complete remission of BPPV required a mean of two treatments. Mean DHI score decreased from 45 points prior to first treatment to 22 points by finished treatment (p<0.001). Similarly, mean VAS score was reduced from 58 to 25 points (p<0.001), and HADS decreased from 8 to 5 points (p<0.001). Patients with cupulolithiasis reported worse vertigo complaints than those with canalolithiasis. All scores correlated positively.CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory BPPV improved significantly by reposition chair management according to all subjective outcomes. Thus, the reposition device could significantly reduce disease burden in the group of patients with BPPV who failed to respond to conventional management. The strong correlation between the scores suggests VAS as a useful tool for vertigo-related patient complaints.",
author = "Niels West and Bloch, {Sune Land} and Moller, {Martin Nue} and Soren Hansen and Mads Klokker",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
doi = "10.5152/iao.2019.5659",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "146--150",
journal = "Mediterranean Journal of Otology",
issn = "0022-2151",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reposition Chair Treatment Improves Subjective Outcomes in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

AU - West, Niels

AU - Bloch, Sune Land

AU - Moller, Martin Nue

AU - Hansen, Soren

AU - Klokker, Mads

PY - 2019/4

Y1 - 2019/4

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Despite increasing utilization of reposition devices in the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), knowledge on subjective outcomes is insufficient. The objective of the present study was to evaluate subjective vertigo complaints and vertigo-associated emotional distress during reposition chair management for refractory BPPV.MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study of subjective and objective data of 31 patients suffering from refractory BPPV representing failed conventional repositioning treatment. At the beginning of each visit, the patients filled out the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Treatment and re-evaluation were repeated every 2 weeks until the patient was declared disease-free.RESULTS: Complete remission of BPPV required a mean of two treatments. Mean DHI score decreased from 45 points prior to first treatment to 22 points by finished treatment (p<0.001). Similarly, mean VAS score was reduced from 58 to 25 points (p<0.001), and HADS decreased from 8 to 5 points (p<0.001). Patients with cupulolithiasis reported worse vertigo complaints than those with canalolithiasis. All scores correlated positively.CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory BPPV improved significantly by reposition chair management according to all subjective outcomes. Thus, the reposition device could significantly reduce disease burden in the group of patients with BPPV who failed to respond to conventional management. The strong correlation between the scores suggests VAS as a useful tool for vertigo-related patient complaints.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Despite increasing utilization of reposition devices in the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), knowledge on subjective outcomes is insufficient. The objective of the present study was to evaluate subjective vertigo complaints and vertigo-associated emotional distress during reposition chair management for refractory BPPV.MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study of subjective and objective data of 31 patients suffering from refractory BPPV representing failed conventional repositioning treatment. At the beginning of each visit, the patients filled out the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Treatment and re-evaluation were repeated every 2 weeks until the patient was declared disease-free.RESULTS: Complete remission of BPPV required a mean of two treatments. Mean DHI score decreased from 45 points prior to first treatment to 22 points by finished treatment (p<0.001). Similarly, mean VAS score was reduced from 58 to 25 points (p<0.001), and HADS decreased from 8 to 5 points (p<0.001). Patients with cupulolithiasis reported worse vertigo complaints than those with canalolithiasis. All scores correlated positively.CONCLUSION: Patients with refractory BPPV improved significantly by reposition chair management according to all subjective outcomes. Thus, the reposition device could significantly reduce disease burden in the group of patients with BPPV who failed to respond to conventional management. The strong correlation between the scores suggests VAS as a useful tool for vertigo-related patient complaints.

U2 - 10.5152/iao.2019.5659

DO - 10.5152/iao.2019.5659

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 146

EP - 150

JO - Mediterranean Journal of Otology

JF - Mediterranean Journal of Otology

SN - 0022-2151

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 58169331