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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Repeated echocardiography after first ever ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention - is it necessary?

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DOI

  1. Prognosis of myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock according to preadmission out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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  2. Selective intracoronary hypothermia in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Rationale and design of the EURO-ICE Trial

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  3. Incidence, Predictors and Outcome of In-Hospital Bleeding in Patients With Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

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  4. Five-year clinical outcomes of zotarolimus-eluting stents in coronary total occlusions

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  5. Five-year risk of heart failure and death following myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock: a nationwide cohort study

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AIM: Changes in left ventricular (LV) function using echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging were assessed in a contemporary ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) population to assess whether repeated imaging is necessary.

METHODS: In a prospective study patients with first STEMI were treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and examined with 2D-echocardiography and CMR at baseline (<72 h) and at a three-month follow-up.

RESULTS: A total of 138 patients were included (60±11 years). Using 2D-echocardiography at baseline preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (>50%) was found in 48 patients (35%), mild/moderate systolic dysfunction (35-50%) in 76 patients (55%) and severe dysfunction (<35%) in 14 patients (10%). Improvement in systolic function group was seen in 58 patients (64%) and 11 patients (79%) with severe systolic dysfunction at baseline were re-classified as having preserved or mild/moderate systolic dysfunction at follow-up. Irrespective of baseline LVEF, deterioration in systolic function group was noted in 14 patients (11%), but no patients declined from preserved to severe systolic dysfunction. The recovered myocardium measured with the myocardial salvage index by CMR was significantly lower with declining LVEF at baseline.

CONCLUSION: The majority of patients with severely depressed LVEF immediately after STEMI significantly improved systolic function after three months. This study emphasises the importance of a repeated LV function assessment at follow-up in patients with mild/moderate or severe systolic dysfunction after STEMI, but re-assessment may not be needed in patients with preserved LVEF at baseline.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care
Volume4
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)528-36
ISSN2048-8726
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ID: 45027131