Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Radiation exposure to surgical staff during F-18-FDG-guided cancer surgery

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. COVID-19 and the brain: impact on nuclear medicine in neurology

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Pharmacokinetic analysis of [68Ga]Ga-DOTA-TOC PET in meningiomas for assessment of in vivo somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. High Sympathetic Activity in Raynaud's Disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleResearchpeer-review

  4. EANM practice guideline/SNMMI procedure standard for dopaminergic imaging in Parkinsonian syndromes 1.0

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Surgical management of rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A case series

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The psychological symptom burden in partners of pancreatic cancer patients: a population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Iatrogenic cerebral radiation necrosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

PURPOSE: High-energy gamma probes have recently become commercially available, developed for (18)F-FDG probe-guided surgery. The radiation received by the staff in the operating room might limit the use of it, but has never been determined. We therefore wanted to measure the absorbed staff doses at operations where patients had received a preoperative injection of (18)F-FDG.

METHODS: Thirty-four patients with different cancers (breast cancer, melanoma, gastrointestinal cancers, respectively) were operated. At every operation the surgeon was monitored with a TLD tablet on his finger of the operating hand and a TLD tablet on the abdomen. The surgeon and anaesthesiologist were also monitored using electronic dosimeters placed in the trousers lining at 25 operations.

RESULTS: The dose rate to the surgeon's abdominal wall varied between 7.5-13.2 microSv/h, depending on tumour location. The doses to the anaesthesiologists and the finger doses to the surgeon were much lower. About 350-400 MBq, i.e. ca. eight times higher activities than those used in the present study are supposed to be necessary for guiding surgery. It can be calculated from the body doses measured that a surgeon can perform between 150-260 h of surgery without exceeding permissible limits for professional workers.

CONCLUSIONS: The radiation load to the operating staff will generally be so small that it does not present any limitation for FDG-guided surgery. However, it is recommended to monitor the surgical staff considering that the surgeon may be exposed to other radiation sources, and since the staff often includes women of child-bearing age.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume35
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)624-9
Number of pages6
ISSN1619-7070
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Denmark, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/analysis, Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data, Radiation Monitoring/methods, Radiopharmaceuticals/analysis, Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data, Surgery, Computer-Assisted/statistics & numerical data

ID: 65735093