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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Prognostic value of contralateral suppression for remission after surgery in patients with primary aldosteronism

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OBJECTIVE: Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of endocrine hypertension and adrenalectomy is the firstline treatment for unilateral PA. Suppression of aldosterone secretion of the nondominant adrenal gland at adrenal venous sampling (AVS), that is, contralateral suppression (CLS) has been suggested as a marker of disease severity. However, whether factors such as CLS, age, gender or comorbidities are associated with remission after surgery is controversial. The objective of this study is to investigate the prognostic value of CLS, age, gender, aldosterone-to-renin ratio, antihypertensives and comorbidities for clinical and biochemical remission following unilateral adrenalectomy in patients with PA.

DESIGN AND PATIENTS: A retrospective study of patients with PA referred for AVS at Rigshospitalet from May 2011 to September 2020, who subsequently underwent adrenalectomy. Clinical remission was defined according to the PA surgical outcome criteria, whereas complete biochemical remission was defined as normalization of hypokalaemia without potassium substitution.

RESULTS: Eighty-four patients were available for analysis of primary outcome. Among patients with CLS, 28/58 (48.3%) obtained complete clinical remission after surgery compared with 10/26 (38.5%) without CLS (p = .40). Complete biochemical remission was obtained in 55/58 (94.8%) of patients with CLS compared with 25/28 (89.3%) without CLS (p = .44). Female gender and lower number of antihypertensives at baseline were associated with higher odds for complete clinical remission, whereas none of the investigated variables were associated with biochemical remission.

CONCLUSION: CLS was not significantly associated with complete clinical or biochemical remission in this cohort. Our results confirmed that female gender and lower number of antihypertensives were predictors of clinical remission.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Endocrinology
Volume96
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)793-802
Number of pages10
ISSN0300-0664
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Research areas

  • Adrenal Glands, Adrenalectomy/methods, Aldosterone, Antihypertensive Agents, Female, Humans, Hyperaldosteronism/drug therapy, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies

ID: 78010743