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Prevention of Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes directed at the family context: a narrative review from the Danish Diabetes Academy symposium

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  • K Kragelund Nielsen
  • L Groth Grunnet
  • H Terkildsen Maindal
  • Danish Diabetes Academy Workshop Workshop Speakers
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In this review, we aim to summarize knowledge about gestational diabetes (GDM) after delivery; with special focus on the potential of preventing Type 2 diabetes in a family context. The review expands on the key messages from a symposium held in Copenhagen in May 2017 and highlights avenues for future research. A narrative review of the symposium presentations and related literature is given. GDM is associated with increased short- and long-term adverse outcomes including Type 2 diabetes for both mother and offspring. Interestingly, women's partners are also at higher risk of Type 2 diabetes. Thus, although GDM is diagnosed in pregnant women, the implications seem to affect the whole family. Structured lifestyle intervention can prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes. In this review, we show how numerous challenges are present in the target group, when such interventions are sought and implemented in real-world settings. Although interlinked and interacting, barriers to maintaining a healthy lifestyle post-partum can be grouped into those pertaining to diabetes beliefs, the family context and the healthcare system. Health literacy level and perceptions of health and disease risk may modify these barriers. There is a need to identify effective approaches to health promotion and health service delivery for women with prior GDM and their families. Future efforts may benefit from involving the target group in the development and execution of such initiatives as one way of ensuring that approaches are tailored to the needs of individual women and their families. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetic Medicine Online
Volume35
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)714-720
Number of pages6
ISSN1464-5491
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article, Review

ID: 53438416