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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Postoperative mobilisation as an indicator for the quality of surgical nursing care

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  1. A simple method to secure data-driven improvement of perioperative care

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  2. Standardising fast-track surgical nursing care in Denmark

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  1. Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) Profile Association with Patient Outcome in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cases

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Length of hospital stay after cesarean section in Denmark from 2004 to 2016: a national register-based study

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  3. Exploring international differences in ovarian cancer treatment: a comparison of clinical practice guidelines and patterns of care

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  4. Ovariecancerbehandling i Danmark

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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BACKGROUND: Postoperative mobilisation is an important part of fundamental care. Increased mobilisation has positive effect on recovery, but immobilisation is still a challenge in postoperative care.

AIMS: To report how the establishment of a national nursing database was used to measure postoperative mobilisation in patients undergoing surgery for ovarian cancer.

METHODS: 'Mobilisation' was defined as at least 3 hours out of bed on postoperative day 1, with the goal set at achieving this in 60% of patients. Data entry was performed by clinical nurses on 4400 patients with ovarian cancer.

FINDINGS: 46.7% of patients met the goal for mobilisation on the first postoperative day, but variations in duration and type of mobilisation were observed. Of those mobilised, 51.8% had been walking in the hallway.

CONCLUSIONS: A national nursing database creates opportunities to optimise fundamental care. By comparing nursing data with oncological, surgical and pathology data it became possible to study mobilisation in relation to cancer stage, comorbidity, treatment and extent of surgery.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Volume30
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)S4-S15
Number of pages8
ISSN0966-0461
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2021

    Research areas

  • Database, Enhanced recovery after surgery, Gynaecology, Mobilisation, Nursing documentation, Postoperative care

ID: 64230542