Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Chronic suppurative otitis media in Zimbabwean school children: a cross-sectional study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Does surgical treatment of nasal airway obstruction improve sexual functions?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Reposition Chair Treatment Improves Subjective Outcomes in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Audiovestibular Loss of Function Correlates in Vestibular Schwannomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Assessing competence in cochlear implant surgery using the newly developed Cochlear Implant Surgery Assessment Tool

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Effect of 3D-Printed Models on Cadaveric Dissection in Temporal Bone Training

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Use of simulation-based training of surgical technical skills among ENTs: an international YO-IFOS survey

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. 3D-Printed Models for Temporal Bone Surgical Training: A Systematic Review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring.

METHODS: Twenty-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis.

RESULTS: In all, 45.5 per cent of participants peaked before the 60-minute time limit. None of the participants achieved the maximum score, suggesting a ceiling effect. The tutored group performed better than the non-tutored group but tutoring did not eliminate the peak or ceiling effects.

CONCLUSION: Timing and adequate instruction is important when using final-product analysis to assess novice mastoidectomy performance. Improved real-time feedback and tutoring could address the limitations of final product based assessment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of laryngology and otology
Volume129
Issue number11
Pages (from-to)1091-6
Number of pages6
ISSN0022-2151
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

ID: 45746089