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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Paper-based sensors for rapid detection of virulence factor produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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  • Fatima AlZahra'a Alatraktchi
  • Jafar Safaa Noori
  • Georgi Plamenov Tanev
  • John Mortensen
  • Maria Dimaki
  • Helle Krogh Johansen
  • Jan Madsen
  • Søren Molin
  • Winnie E Svendsen
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Pyocyanin is a toxin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we describe a novel paper-based electrochemical sensor for pyocyanin detection, manufactured with a simple and inexpensive approach based on electrode printing on paper. The resulting sensors constitute an effective electrochemical method to quantify pyocyanin in bacterial cultures without the conventional time consuming pretreatment of the samples. The electrochemical properties of the paper-based sensors were evaluated by ferri/ferrocyanide as a redox mediator, and showed reliable sensing performance. The paper-based sensors readily allow for the determination of pyocyanin in bacterial cultures with high reproducibility, achieving a limit of detection of 95 nM and a sensitivity of 4.30 μA/μM in standard culture media. Compared to the similar commercial ceramic based sensors, it is a 2.3-fold enhanced performance. The simple in-house fabrication of sensors for pyocyanin quantification allows researchers to understand in vitro adaptation of P. aeruginosa infections via rapid screenings of bacterial cultures that otherwise are expensive and time-consuming.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS One
Volume13
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)e0194157
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Research areas

  • Biosensing Techniques, Humans, Paper, Pseudomonas Infections/diagnosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/metabolism, Pyocyanine/analysis, Sensitivity and Specificity, Virulence Factors/analysis

ID: 56201764