Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels causes migraine attacks: a new target for the treatment of migraine

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Transcriptome analysis in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Multiple sclerosis among first- and second-generation immigrants in Denmark: a population-based cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Neuronal mechanisms of mutations in SCN8A causing epilepsy or intellectual disability

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Meningeal contribution to migraine pain: a magnetic resonance angiography study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Proinflammatory CD20+ T cells in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. PACAP27 induces migraine-like attacks in migraine patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Functional connectivity studies in migraine: what have we learned?

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-27 on cerebral hemodynamics in healthy volunteers: A 3T MRI study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide - beyond migraine prophylaxis

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Migraine is one of the most disabling and prevalent of all disorders. To improve understanding of migraine mechanisms and to suggest a new therapeutic target, we investigated whether opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) would cause migraine attacks. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 16 patients aged 18-49 years with one to five migraine attacks a month were randomly allocated to receive an infusion of 0.05 mg/min KATP channel opener levcromakalim and placebo on two different days (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03228355). The primary endpoints were the difference in incidence of migraine attacks, headaches and the difference in area under the curve (AUC) for headache intensity scores (0-12 h) and for middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (0-2 h) between levcromakalim and placebo. Between 24 May 2017 and 23 November 2017, 16 patients randomly received levcromakalim and placebo on two different days. Sixteen patients (100%) developed migraine attacks after levcromakalim compared with one patient (6%) after placebo (P = 0.0001); the difference of incidence is 94% [95% confidence interval (CI) 78-100%]. The incidence of headache over the 12 h observation period was higher but not significant after levcromakalim (n = 16) than after placebo (n = 7) (P = 0.016) (95% CI 16-71%). The AUC for headache intensity was significantly larger after levcromakalim compared to placebo (AUC0-12h, P < 0.0001). There was no change in mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity after levcromakalim compared to placebo (AUC0-2hP = 0.46). Opening of KATP channels caused migraine attacks in all patients. This suggests a crucial role of these channels in migraine pathophysiology and that KATP channel blockers could be potential targets for novel drugs for migraine.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain : a journal of neurology
Volume142
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)2644-2654
Number of pages11
ISSN0006-8950
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 58919719