Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

No-Fault Compensation From the Patient Compensation Association in Denmark After Primary Total Hip Replacement in Danish Hospitals 2005-2017

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. General Assembly, Prevention, Host Risk Mitigation - General Factors: Proceedings of International Consensus on Orthopedic Infections

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for Stroke in Fast-Track Hip and Knee Arthroplasty-A Clinical Registry Study of 24,862 Procedures

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The Role of Psychiatric Diagnoses for Outcome After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Preoperative BMD does not influence femoral stem subsidence of uncemented THA when the femoral T-score is > -2.5

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. No difference for changes in BMD between two different cementless hip stem designs 2 years after THA

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: There is an annually rising number of performed total hip arthroplasty (THA) surgeries in Denmark and this is expected to become even more common. However, there are still risks of adverse events, which become the basis for compensation claims. In Denmark, there are no studies available concerning filed claims after THA. The aims of this study are to determine the incidence of claims related to THAs in Denmark, the reasons to claim, which claims lead to compensation, the amount of compensation, and trends over time.

METHODS: In this observational study, we analyzed all closed claims between 2005 and 2017 from the Danish Patient Compensation Association (DPCA). With the intention to contribute to prevention, we have identified the number and outcome of claims.

RESULTS: There were 2924 cases (ie, 2.5% of all THAs performed in this period). The approval rate was 54%. The number of claims filed was stagnant over time, except for a spike of metal-on-metal (MoM) prosthesis cases. The total payout was USD 29,591,045, and 87% of this was due to nerve damage (USD 9,106,118), infection (USD 6,046,948), MoM prosthesis (USD 4,624,353), insufficient or incorrect treatment (USD 472,500), and fracture (USD 2,088,110).

CONCLUSION: In total, 2.5% of all THAs performed between 2005 and 2017 lead to a claim submission at the DPCA. One of 2 claims were approved. The majority of payouts were due to nerve damage, infection, MoM prosthesis, insufficient or incorrect treatment, and fracture. Although DPCA manages claims for patients, the data can also provide beneficial feedback to arthroplasty surgeons with the aim of improving patient care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of arthroplasty
Volume35
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)1784-1791
Number of pages8
ISSN0883-5403
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

ID: 62388652