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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Muscle biopsies off-set normal cellular signaling in surrounding musculature

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Studies of muscle physiology and muscular disorders often require muscle biopsies to answer questions about muscle biology. In this context, we have often wondered if muscle biopsies, especially if performed repeatedly, would affect interpretation of muscle morphology and cellular signaling. We hypothesized that muscle morphology and cellular signaling involved in myogenesis/regeneration and protein turnover can be changed by a previous muscle biopsy in close proximity to the area under investigation. Here we report a case where a past biopsy or biopsies affect cellular signaling of the surrounding muscle tissue for at least 3 weeks after the biopsy was performed and magnetic resonance imaging suggests that an effect of a biopsy may persist for at least 5 months. Cellular signaling after a biopsy resembles what is seen in severe limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I with respect to protein synthesis and myogenesis despite normal histologic appearance.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNeuromuscular disorders : NMD
Volume23
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)981-5
Number of pages5
ISSN0960-8966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

ID: 43186734