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Managing Known Difficult Airways in Obstetric Patients Using a Flexible Bronchoscope and IRRIS: A Case-Illustrated Guide for Nonexpert Anesthesiologists, without Surgical Backup

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Infrared flashing light through the cricothyroid membrane to guide flexible bronchoscopic tracheal intubation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Exploring the limits of prolonged apnoea with high-flow nasal oxygen: an observational study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Anesthesiologists’ airway management expertise: Identifying subjective and objective knowledge gaps

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Ultrasound identification of the cricothyroid membrane: the new standard in preparing for front-of-neck airway access

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

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Pregnancy is associated with anatomical and physiological changes leading to potential difficult airway management. Some pregnant women have known difficult airways and cannot be intubated even with a hyperangulated videolaryngoscope. If neuraxial techniques are also impossible, awake tracheal intubation with a flexible bronchoscope may be one of the few available options to avoid more invasive techniques. The Infrared Red Intubation System (IRRIS) may help nonexpert anesthesiologists in such situations and may enhance the chance of successful intubation increasing safety for the mother and the fetus, especially in hospitals without the ear, nose, and throat surgical backup.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6778805
JournalCase reports in anesthesiology
Volume2021
Pages (from-to)6778805
ISSN2090-6382
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 Kjartan E. Hannig et al.

ID: 69209012