Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality-a Danish nationwide cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Sperling, Cecilie D ; Verdoodt, Freija ; Aalborg, Gitte L ; Dehlendorff, Christian ; Friis, Søren ; Kjaer, Susanne K. / Low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality-a Danish nationwide cohort study. In: International Journal of Epidemiology. 2020 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 330-337.

Bibtex

@article{2b6dc166f6fc4cb8a92d9bafd8c87836,
title = "Low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality-a Danish nationwide cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggests that aspirin use may improve survival in cancer patients, however, for endometrial cancer, epidemiological evidence is limited and results are equivocal. In a nationwide cohort study, we examined the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality.METHODS: From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified all women with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Women diagnosed between 2000 and 2012, aged 30-84 years, who had no history of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) and were alive 1 year after the cancer diagnosis were eligible. We obtained information on pre- and post-diagnostic use (≥1 prescription) of low-dose aspirin, mortality and potential confounding factors from nationwide registries. Using Cox regression models, we estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality. The exposure was modelled as both time-varying as well as time-fixed within exposure windows of 1 and 5 years.RESULTS: We identified 6694 endometrial cancer patients with a maximum follow-up of 13 years. In the time-varying analysis, post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with a HR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.90-1.33) for endometrial cancer mortality. We found no indication of a dose-response association according to increasing tablet strength, cumulative amount or duration of use, and the HRs were similar for pre-diagnostic and post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use compared with non-use.CONCLUSIONS: We found no indication that post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with reduced mortality for endometrial cancer; rather our findings suggested a concern for increased mortality.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage, Aspirin/administration & dosage, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Denmark/epidemiology, Endometrial Neoplasms/mortality, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Registries, Risk Factors, Survival Analysis",
author = "Sperling, {Cecilie D} and Freija Verdoodt and Aalborg, {Gitte L} and Christian Dehlendorff and S{\o}ren Friis and Kjaer, {Susanne K}",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2019; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.",
year = "2020",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ije/dyz253",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "330--337",
journal = "International Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0300-5771",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality-a Danish nationwide cohort study

AU - Sperling, Cecilie D

AU - Verdoodt, Freija

AU - Aalborg, Gitte L

AU - Dehlendorff, Christian

AU - Friis, Søren

AU - Kjaer, Susanne K

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

PY - 2020/2/1

Y1 - 2020/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggests that aspirin use may improve survival in cancer patients, however, for endometrial cancer, epidemiological evidence is limited and results are equivocal. In a nationwide cohort study, we examined the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality.METHODS: From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified all women with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Women diagnosed between 2000 and 2012, aged 30-84 years, who had no history of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) and were alive 1 year after the cancer diagnosis were eligible. We obtained information on pre- and post-diagnostic use (≥1 prescription) of low-dose aspirin, mortality and potential confounding factors from nationwide registries. Using Cox regression models, we estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality. The exposure was modelled as both time-varying as well as time-fixed within exposure windows of 1 and 5 years.RESULTS: We identified 6694 endometrial cancer patients with a maximum follow-up of 13 years. In the time-varying analysis, post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with a HR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.90-1.33) for endometrial cancer mortality. We found no indication of a dose-response association according to increasing tablet strength, cumulative amount or duration of use, and the HRs were similar for pre-diagnostic and post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use compared with non-use.CONCLUSIONS: We found no indication that post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with reduced mortality for endometrial cancer; rather our findings suggested a concern for increased mortality.

AB - BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence suggests that aspirin use may improve survival in cancer patients, however, for endometrial cancer, epidemiological evidence is limited and results are equivocal. In a nationwide cohort study, we examined the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality.METHODS: From the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified all women with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Women diagnosed between 2000 and 2012, aged 30-84 years, who had no history of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) and were alive 1 year after the cancer diagnosis were eligible. We obtained information on pre- and post-diagnostic use (≥1 prescription) of low-dose aspirin, mortality and potential confounding factors from nationwide registries. Using Cox regression models, we estimated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use and endometrial cancer mortality. The exposure was modelled as both time-varying as well as time-fixed within exposure windows of 1 and 5 years.RESULTS: We identified 6694 endometrial cancer patients with a maximum follow-up of 13 years. In the time-varying analysis, post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with a HR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.90-1.33) for endometrial cancer mortality. We found no indication of a dose-response association according to increasing tablet strength, cumulative amount or duration of use, and the HRs were similar for pre-diagnostic and post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use compared with non-use.CONCLUSIONS: We found no indication that post-diagnostic low-dose aspirin use was associated with reduced mortality for endometrial cancer; rather our findings suggested a concern for increased mortality.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/administration & dosage

KW - Aspirin/administration & dosage

KW - Cause of Death

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Endometrial Neoplasms/mortality

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Proportional Hazards Models

KW - Registries

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Survival Analysis

U2 - 10.1093/ije/dyz253

DO - 10.1093/ije/dyz253

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31845990

VL - 49

SP - 330

EP - 337

JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0300-5771

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 61593974