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Long-Term Survival, Morbidity, Social Functioning and Risk of Disability in Patients with a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 or Type 2 Central Nervous System Infection, Denmark, 2000-2016

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@article{dc45ecaebf83483baaf14ece99204e5a,
title = "Long-Term Survival, Morbidity, Social Functioning and Risk of Disability in Patients with a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 or Type 2 Central Nervous System Infection, Denmark, 2000-2016",
abstract = "Background: The long-term prognosis following herpes simplex virus (HSV) central nervous system (CNS) infection is still debated.Patients and Methods: We examined outcomes in all Danish residents who, during 2000-2016, tested PCR positive for HSV-1 (n=208) or HSV-2 (n=283) in the cerebrospinal fluid, compared to comparison cohorts from the general population (n=2080 and n=2830).Results: One-year mortality was increased among HSV-1 patients (difference 19.3{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 13.6{\%} to 25.0{\%}) and HSV-2 patients (difference 5.3{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 2.5{\%} to 8.1{\%}), but thereafter mortality was not increased. After exclusion of persons diagnosed with cancer prior to study inclusion, one-year mortality difference for HSV-2 patients was 1.7{\%} (-0.1{\%} to 3.5{\%}). After five years, HSV-1 patients had lower employment (difference -19.8{\%}; 95{\%} CI: -34.7{\%} to -4.8{\%}) and higher disability pension rates (difference 22.2{\%}; 95{\%} CI: 8.4{\%} to 36.0{\%}) than the comparison cohort, but similar number of inpatient days, outpatient visits, and sick leave. HSV-2 patients had employment and disability pension rates comparable to the comparison cohort, but more inpatient days (difference 1.5/year; 95{\%} CI: -0.2 to 3.2), outpatient visits (difference 1.3/year; 95{\%} CI: 0.3 to 3.2), and sick leave days (difference 9.1/year; 95{\%} CI: 7.9 to 10.4).Conclusion: HSV-1 and HSV-2 CNS infections differ substantially with respect to prognosis. HSV-1 CNS infection is followed by increased short-term mortality and long-term risk of disability. HSV-2 CNS infection has no substantial impact on mortality or working capability but is associated with increased morbidity.",
keywords = "Cohort study, Herpes simplex virus encephalitis, Herpes simplex virus meningitis, Outcome, Prognosis",
author = "Hansen, {Ann-Brit E} and Vestergaard, {Hanne T} and Dessau, {Ram B} and Jacob Bodilsen and Andersen, {Nanna S} and Omland, {Lars H} and Christiansen, {Claus B} and Svend Ellermann-Eriksen and Lene Nielsen and Thomas Benfield and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik T} and Andersen, {Christian {\O}} and Anne-Mette Lebech and Niels Obel",
note = "{\circledC} 2020 Hansen et al.",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2147/CLEP.S256838",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "745--755",
journal = "Clinical Epidemiology",
issn = "1179-1349",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Survival, Morbidity, Social Functioning and Risk of Disability in Patients with a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 or Type 2 Central Nervous System Infection, Denmark, 2000-2016

AU - Hansen, Ann-Brit E

AU - Vestergaard, Hanne T

AU - Dessau, Ram B

AU - Bodilsen, Jacob

AU - Andersen, Nanna S

AU - Omland, Lars H

AU - Christiansen, Claus B

AU - Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

AU - Nielsen, Lene

AU - Benfield, Thomas

AU - Sørensen, Henrik T

AU - Andersen, Christian Ø

AU - Lebech, Anne-Mette

AU - Obel, Niels

N1 - © 2020 Hansen et al.

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - Background: The long-term prognosis following herpes simplex virus (HSV) central nervous system (CNS) infection is still debated.Patients and Methods: We examined outcomes in all Danish residents who, during 2000-2016, tested PCR positive for HSV-1 (n=208) or HSV-2 (n=283) in the cerebrospinal fluid, compared to comparison cohorts from the general population (n=2080 and n=2830).Results: One-year mortality was increased among HSV-1 patients (difference 19.3%; 95% CI: 13.6% to 25.0%) and HSV-2 patients (difference 5.3%; 95% CI: 2.5% to 8.1%), but thereafter mortality was not increased. After exclusion of persons diagnosed with cancer prior to study inclusion, one-year mortality difference for HSV-2 patients was 1.7% (-0.1% to 3.5%). After five years, HSV-1 patients had lower employment (difference -19.8%; 95% CI: -34.7% to -4.8%) and higher disability pension rates (difference 22.2%; 95% CI: 8.4% to 36.0%) than the comparison cohort, but similar number of inpatient days, outpatient visits, and sick leave. HSV-2 patients had employment and disability pension rates comparable to the comparison cohort, but more inpatient days (difference 1.5/year; 95% CI: -0.2 to 3.2), outpatient visits (difference 1.3/year; 95% CI: 0.3 to 3.2), and sick leave days (difference 9.1/year; 95% CI: 7.9 to 10.4).Conclusion: HSV-1 and HSV-2 CNS infections differ substantially with respect to prognosis. HSV-1 CNS infection is followed by increased short-term mortality and long-term risk of disability. HSV-2 CNS infection has no substantial impact on mortality or working capability but is associated with increased morbidity.

AB - Background: The long-term prognosis following herpes simplex virus (HSV) central nervous system (CNS) infection is still debated.Patients and Methods: We examined outcomes in all Danish residents who, during 2000-2016, tested PCR positive for HSV-1 (n=208) or HSV-2 (n=283) in the cerebrospinal fluid, compared to comparison cohorts from the general population (n=2080 and n=2830).Results: One-year mortality was increased among HSV-1 patients (difference 19.3%; 95% CI: 13.6% to 25.0%) and HSV-2 patients (difference 5.3%; 95% CI: 2.5% to 8.1%), but thereafter mortality was not increased. After exclusion of persons diagnosed with cancer prior to study inclusion, one-year mortality difference for HSV-2 patients was 1.7% (-0.1% to 3.5%). After five years, HSV-1 patients had lower employment (difference -19.8%; 95% CI: -34.7% to -4.8%) and higher disability pension rates (difference 22.2%; 95% CI: 8.4% to 36.0%) than the comparison cohort, but similar number of inpatient days, outpatient visits, and sick leave. HSV-2 patients had employment and disability pension rates comparable to the comparison cohort, but more inpatient days (difference 1.5/year; 95% CI: -0.2 to 3.2), outpatient visits (difference 1.3/year; 95% CI: 0.3 to 3.2), and sick leave days (difference 9.1/year; 95% CI: 7.9 to 10.4).Conclusion: HSV-1 and HSV-2 CNS infections differ substantially with respect to prognosis. HSV-1 CNS infection is followed by increased short-term mortality and long-term risk of disability. HSV-2 CNS infection has no substantial impact on mortality or working capability but is associated with increased morbidity.

KW - Cohort study

KW - Herpes simplex virus encephalitis

KW - Herpes simplex virus meningitis

KW - Outcome

KW - Prognosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85088413484&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2147/CLEP.S256838

DO - 10.2147/CLEP.S256838

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

SP - 745

EP - 755

JO - Clinical Epidemiology

JF - Clinical Epidemiology

SN - 1179-1349

ER -

ID: 60614196