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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Long-term survival, health, social functioning, and education in patients with an enterovirus central nervous system infection, Denmark, 1997-2016

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BACKGROUND: The long-term clinical course of patients with an enterovirus central nervous system infection (ECI) is poorly understood.

METHODS: We performed a nationwide population-based cohort study of all Danish patients with ECI diagnosed 1997-2016 (n = 1745) and a comparison cohort from the general population individually matched on date of birth and sex (n = 17 450). Outcomes were categorized into mortality and risk of cancer and likely measures of neurological sequelae: neuropsychiatric morbidities, educational landmarks, use of hospital services, employment, receipt of disability pension, income, number of sick leave days, and nursing home residency.

RESULTS: Mortality in the first year was higher among patients with ECI (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 10.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.17-24.1), but thereafter mortality was not higher (MMR = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.47-1.86). Long-term outcomes for patients with ECI were not inferior to those of the comparison cohort for risk of cancer, epilepsy, mental and behavioral disorders, dementia, depression, school start, school marks, high school education, use of hospital services, employment, receipt of disability pension, income, days of sick leave, or nursing home residency.

CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of an ECI had no substantial impact on long-term survival, health, or social/educational functioning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of infectious diseases
Volume222
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)619-627
Number of pages9
ISSN0022-1899
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2020

    Research areas

  • Enterovirus meningitis, Meningitis, Viral meningitis

ID: 59633259