Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Long-Term Follow-Up and Predictors of Functional Outcome after Surgery for Spinal Meningiomas: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Pathologic Characteristics of Pregnancy-Related Meningiomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Small RNAs in Seminal Plasma as Novel Biomarkers for Germ Cell Tumors

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Molecular Profiling of Docetaxel-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells Identifies Multiple Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Risk factors for need of reoperation in bilateral chronic subdural haematomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Pre-Chiasmatic, Single Injection of Autologous Blood to Induce Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Rat Model

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Development and external validation of a clinical prediction model for functional impairment after intracranial tumor surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Surgeons' experience of venous risk with CPA surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Jenny Pettersson-Segerlind
  • Alexander Fletcher-Sandersjöö
  • Charles Tatter
  • Gustav Burström
  • Oscar Persson
  • Petter Förander
  • Tiit Mathiesen
  • Jiri Bartek
  • Erik Edström
  • Adrian Elmi-Terander
View graph of relations

Spinal meningiomas are the most common adult primary spinal tumor, constituting 24-45% of spinal intradural tumors and 2% of all meningiomas. The aim of this study was to assess postoperative complications, long-term outcomes, predictors of functional improvement and differences between elderly (≥70 years) and non-elderly (18-69 years) patients surgically treated for spinal meningiomas. Variables were retrospectively collected from patient charts and magnetic resonance images. Baseline comparisons, paired testing and regression analyses were used. In conclusion, 129 patients were included, with a median follow-up time of 8.2 years. Motor deficit was the most common presenting symptom (66%). The median time between diagnosis and surgery was 1.3 months. A postoperative complication occurred in 10 (7.8%) and tumor growth or recurrence in 6 (4.7%) patients. Surgery was associated with significant improvement of motor and sensory deficit, gait disturbance, bladder dysfunction and pain. Time to surgery, tumor area and the degree of spinal cord compression significantly predicted postoperative improvement in a modified McCormick scale (mMCs) in the univariable regression analysis, and spinal cord compression showed independent risk association in multivariable analysis. There was no difference in improvement, complications or tumor control between elderly and non-elderly patients. We concluded that surgery of spinal meningiomas was associated with significant long-term neurological improvement, which could be predicted by time to surgery, tumor size and spinal cord compression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3244
JournalCancers
Volume13
Issue number13
ISSN2072-6694
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2021

    Research areas

  • Age, Elderly, Meningioma, Neurosurgery, Spinal meningioma, Spine, Surgery

ID: 66556947