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Late adverse effects and quality of life in survivors of testicular germ cell tumour

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  1. Application of miRNAs in the diagnosis and monitoring of testicular germ cell tumours

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  2. Oxytocin antagonists: the next frontier in PE treatment

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  3. Clarifying the link between ibuprofen and hypogonadism

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  4. Position paper: Rationale for the treatment of Wilms tumour in the UMBRELLA SIOP-RTSG 2016 protocol

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  5. Semen quality in the 21(st) century

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  1. Nationwide Survival Benefit after Implementation of First-Line Immunotherapy for Patients with Advanced NSCLC-Real World Efficacy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Long-term neurotoxicity and quality of life in testicular cancer survivors-a nationwide cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass

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  4. Small RNAs in Seminal Plasma as Novel Biomarkers for Germ Cell Tumors

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Currently, ~95% of patients with testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) are cured, resulting in an increasing number of TGCT survivors. Although cured, these men face potential late adverse effects and reduced quality of life. Survivors face a twofold increased risk of second malignant neoplasms after chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with evidence of dose-dependent associations. For survivors managed with surveillance or treated with radiotherapy, the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comparable to the risk in the general population, whereas treatment with chemotherapy increases the risk of life-threatening CVD, especially during treatment and after 10 years of follow-up. Other adverse effects are organ-related toxicities such as neuropathy and ototoxicity. Pulmonary and renal impairment in patients with TGCT treated with chemotherapy is limited. Survivors of TGCT might experience psychosocial distress including anxiety disorders, fear of cancer recurrence and TGCT-specific issues, such as sexual dysfunction. Late adverse effects can be avoided in most patients with stage I disease if followed on a surveillance programme. However, patients with disseminated disease can experience toxicities associated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and/or adverse effects related to surgery for residual disease. The severity of adverse effects increases with dose of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This Review discusses the most recent data concerning the late adverse effects of today's standard treatments for TGCT.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNature reviews. Urology
Volume18
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)227-245
Number of pages19
ISSN1759-4812
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

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© 2021, Springer Nature Limited.

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Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

ID: 64231866