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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy-planning behavior?

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    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Jenny Stern
  • Lana Salih Joelsson
  • Tanja Tydén
  • Anna Berglund
  • Maria Ekstrand
  • Hanne Hegaard
  • Clara Aarts
  • Andreas Rosenblad
  • Margareta Larsson
  • Per Kristiansson
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INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of planned pregnancies varies between countries but is often measured in a dichotomous manner. The aim of this study was to investigate to what level pregnant women had planned their pregnancies and whether pregnancy planning was associated with background characteristics and pregnancy-planning behavior.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study that utilized the baseline measurements from the Swedish Pregnancy Planning study. Pregnant women (n = 3390) recruited at antenatal clinics answered a questionnaire. Data were analyzed with multinomial logistic regression, Kruskal-Wallis H and chi-squared tests.

RESULTS: Three of four pregnancies were very or fairly planned and 12% fairly or very unplanned. Of women with very unplanned pregnancies, 32% had considered an induced abortion. Women with planned pregnancies were more likely to have a higher level of education, higher household income, to be currently working (≥50%) and to have longer relationships than women with unplanned pregnancies. The level of pregnancy planning was associated with planning behavior, such as information-seeking and intake of folic acid, but without a reduction in alcohol consumption. One-third of all women took folic acid 1 month prior to conception, 17% used tobacco daily and 11% used alcohol weekly 3 months before conception.

CONCLUSIONS: A majority rated their pregnancy as very or fairly planned, with socio-economic factors as explanatory variables. The level of pregnancy planning should be queried routinely to enable individualized counseling, especially for women with unplanned pregnancies. Preconception recommendations need to be established and communicated to the public to increase health promoting planning behavior.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume95
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)182-9
Number of pages8
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

    Research areas

  • Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Family Planning Services, Female, Humans, Pregnancy, Pregnant Women, Surveys and Questionnaires, Sweden, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 51518552