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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Incidence and survival of head and neck cancer in the Faroe Islands

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  1. Low prevalence of retinopathy among Greenland Inuit

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  2. Diabetes in Greenland - how to deliver diabetes care in a country with a geographically dispersed population

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  3. Improved survival of head and neck cancer patients in Greenland

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  4. Oncological treatment and outcome of colorectal cancer in Greenland

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  1. Distant metastases in squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and larynx: a population-based DAHANCA study

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  2. Nasopharyngeal malignancies in Denmark diagnosed from 1980 to 2014

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  3. Systematic review on the current knowledge and use of Single-cell RNA Sequencing in Head and Neck Cancer

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  4. Impact of human papillomavirus in sinonasal cancer-a systematic review

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Background: The Faroese people constitute a geographically isolated population, and research on cancer in this population is sparse. Thus, this study aimed to calculate the age-standardised incidence rate (ASIR) and 5-year survival rates in head and neck cancers (HNC) in the Faroese population from 1985 to 2017.Materials and methods: All patients registered with HNC in the Faroese Cancer Registry (FCR) from 1985 to 2017 were included. The ASIR per 100,000 (World Standard Population) and 5-year survival rates were calculated. We also calculated the distribution of tobacco, alcohol consumption, cancer stages and various timelines. Results: 202 patients were included in the study (62% men). The ASIR for all HNC was 10.0/100,000 persons-years and was higher among men than women. Women's survival rate was significantly higher than men's (p = 0.026). The results imply that oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) had the best survival rate and was diagnosed at a significantly earlier stage.Conclusion: This retrospective nation-wide study showed that ASIRs and 5-year survival rates for Faroese HNC patients in general resembled the ones reported for Danish HNC patients. Timelines for Faroese HNC patients were shorter compared with Greenlandic HNC patients, but longer compared with the Danish fast track programme limits.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1894697
JournalInternational Journal of Circumpolar Health
Volume80
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)1894697
ISSN1239-9736
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2021

    Research areas

  • epidemiology, faroe Islands, Head and neck cancer, incidence, survival

ID: 67843833