Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Impact of naturalistic lighting on hospitalized stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit: Design and measurement

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Decrease in scale invariance of activity fluctuations with aging and in patients with suprasellar tumors

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Can sleep quality and wellbeing be improved by changing the indoor lighting in the homes of healthy, elderly citizens?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Lemierre's syndrome with stroke and stenosis of the internal carotid artery suggesting focal vasculitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Long-term health and socioeconomic consequences of childhood and adolescent-onset of narcolepsy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Quantitative Signal Intensity in Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery and Treatment Effect in the WAKE-UP Trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The role of sleep in the pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  5. CD8+ T cells from patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls recognize hypocretin neuron-specific antigens

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

INTRODUCTION AND RATIONALE: Stroke is a major cause of acquired cerebral disability among adults, frequently accompanied by depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, disrupted sleep and fatigue. New ways of intervention to prevent these complications are therefore needed. The major circadian regulator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, is mainly controlled by natural daylight, and the blue spectrum is considered the most powerful. During stroke rehabilitation, patients typically are mostly indoors and therefore not exposed to the natural daytime variation in light intensity. Furthermore, several rehabilitation hospitals may be exposed to powerful light in the blue spectrum, but at a time that is adversely related to their endogenous circadian phase, for example in the late evening instead of the daytime.

HYPOTHESIS: Naturalistic light that mimics the natural daytime spectrum variation will have a positive impact on the health of poststroke patients admitted to rehabilitation. We test specifically for improved sleep and less fatigue (questionnaires, polysomnography, Actiwatch), improved well-being (questionnaires), lessen anxiety and depression (questionnaires), improved cognition (tests), stabilizing of the autonomous nervous system (ECG/HR, blood pressure, temperature) and stabilizing of the diurnal biochemistry (blood markers).

STUDY DESIGN: The study is a prospective parallel longitudinal randomized controlled study (quasi randomization). Stroke patients in need of rehabilitation will be included at the acute stroke unit and randomized to either the intervention unit (naturalistic lighting) or the control unit (CU) (standard lighting). The naturalistic light is installed in the entire IU (Cromaviso, Denmark).

CONCLUSION: This study aims to elucidate the influence of naturalistic light on patients during long-term hospitalization in a real hospital setting. The hypotheses are based on preclinical research, as studies using naturalistic light have never been performed before. Investigating the effects of naturalistic light in a clinical setting is therefore much needed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalChronobiology International
Volume34
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)687-697
Number of pages11
ISSN0742-0528
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 52614883