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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Immunoglobulin M: Restrainer of Inflammation and Mediator of Immune Evasion by Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

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DOI

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  1. Frequency of Electrocardiographic Alterations and Pericardial Effusion in Patients With Uncomplicated Malaria

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  2. PfEMP1-Specific Immunoglobulin G Reactivity Among Beninese Pregnant Women With Sickle Cell Trait

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  3. Afucosylated Plasmodium falciparum-specific IgG is induced by infection but not by subunit vaccination

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  4. Heart failure associated with imported malaria: a nationwide Danish cohort study

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  5. Suitability of IgG responses to multiple Plasmodium falciparum antigens as markers of transmission intensity and pattern

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Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is an ancient antibody class that is found in all vertebrates, with the exception of coelacanths, and is indispensable in both innate and adaptive immunity. The equally ancient human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, formed an intimate relationship with IgM with which it co-evolved. In this article, we discuss the association between IgM and human malaria parasites, building on several recent publications that implicate IgM as a crucial molecule that determines both host and parasite survival. Consequently, a better understanding of this association may lead to the development of improved intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume32
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)108-19
Number of pages12
ISSN1471-4922
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

    Research areas

  • Animals, Host-Parasite Interactions, Humans, Immune Evasion, Immunoglobulin M, Inflammation, Malaria, Falciparum, Plasmodium falciparum, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review

ID: 49204928