Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Immunogenicity of Anti-TNF-α Biotherapies: II. Clinical Relevance of Methods Used for Anti-Drug Antibody Detection

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Applicability of Small-Molecule Inhibitors in the Study of Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase 2 (PAD2) and PAD4

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Functional Effects of Receptor-Binding Domain Mutations of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351 and P.1 Variants

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Host Genetics and Antiviral Immune Responses in Adult Patients With Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Therapeutic thresholds and mechanisms for primary non-response to infliximab in inflammatory bowel disease

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Personalized medicine in rheumatoid arthritis: How immunogenicity impacts use of TNF inhibitors

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Pattern recognition receptor polymorphisms in early periodontitis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Lewis and AB0 blood group-phenotypes in periodontitis, cardiovascular disease, obesity and stroke

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals is complex and influenced by both structural and pharmacological factors, and by patient-related conditions such as disease being treated, previous and concomitant therapies, and individual immune responsiveness. Essential for tailored therapeutic strategies based on immunopharmacological evidence from individual patients (personalized medicine) is the use of assays for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) that are accurate and relevant in the clinical setting. This paper discusses immunogenicity of genetically engineered immunoglobulins directed against tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF). Emphasis will be on commonly used methods for detection of ADA in human serum including issues that question the clinical applicability of these methodologies. The use of dubious assays for ADA in a clinical context may not only contribute to confusion as to the importance of drug immunogenicity but may also prevent development of safe and cost-effective ways of using biological TNF-antagonists.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume6
Pages (from-to)109
ISSN1664-3224
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ID: 46263201