Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and subsequent risk of solid cancer--A nationwide cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Testicular cancer incidence predictions in Europe 2010–2035: A rising burden despite population ageing

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Menstrual pain and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Tibolone and risk of gynecological hormone sensitive cancer

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Does HPV status influence survival after vulvar cancer?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Ovarian and Breast Cancer Risks Associated With Pathogenic Variants in RAD51C and RAD51D

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Gynaecological cancer leads to long-term sick leave and permanently reduced working ability years after diagnosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Prevalence, incidence, and natural history of HPV infection in adult women ages 24 to 45 participating in a vaccine trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oral epithelial dysplasia: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  5. Emergency contraceptive pill use among women in Denmark, Norway and Sweden: Population-based survey

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) have higher levels of antiangiogenic growth factors during pregnancy than women with normotensive pregnancies. Since angiogenesis is necessary for solid cancer growth and spread, we hypothesized that women with a history of HDP might have a reduced risk of solid cancers (cancers other than lymphomas, hematologic cancers and nonmelanoma skin cancers) later in life. In a register-based cohort study of 1.08 million women giving birth at least once between 1978 and 2011, we used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) comparing solid cancer rates for women with and without a history of HDP. In this cohort, 68,236 women (6.3%) had ≥1 pregnancy complicated by HDP and 42,236 women (3.9%) developed solid tumors during follow-up. A history of HDP was not associated with a clinically meaningful reduction in the overall rate of solid cancer (HR 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.00), regardless of HDP severity or time since HDP, nor was there a general tendency toward reduced solid cancer rates across organ sites. A history of HDP was only significantly associated with decreased rates of breast and lung cancers and with increased rates of endometrial and urinary tract cancers. Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that women with a history of HDP have a reduced overall risk of solid cancer due to a persistent post-HDP antiangiogenic state or an innate tendency toward antiangiogenesis. Observed associations with specific cancers may instead be due to other pregnancy-related mechanisms or to residual/unmeasured confounding.

Original languageEnglish
JournalRadiation Oncology Investigations
Volume139
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)58-64
Number of pages7
ISSN0020-7136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

    Research areas

  • Adult, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pregnancy, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

ID: 49570000