Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Human Lens Transmission of Blue Light: A Comparison of Autofluorescence-Based and Direct Spectral Transmission Determination

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearch

DOI

  1. Can DMCO Detect Visual Field Loss in Neurological Patients? A Secondary Validation Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Aquaporin-1 Expression in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Overlying Retinal Drusen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Retinal layer location of increased retinal thickness in eyes with subclinical and clinical macular edema in diabetes type 2

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Primary congenital glaucoma in Denmark, 1977-2016

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflex and sleep quality in patients with normal tension glaucoma

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. An Expanded Test Panel for Assessment of Fringe Benefits From Cataract Surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

  4. Periocular necrotizing soft tissue infection in Greater Copenhagen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
Purpose: Direct measurement of the transmission of light through the human lens is not possible in vivo unless invasive techniques are used. In the current study, a reliable in vivo estimate of the transmission of blue light through the lens was assessed by comparing an indirect and noninvasive method based on autofluorescence measurements with a direct method. Methods: Total transmission of blue light was measured in human donor lenses using a direct method applicable only in vitro and compared with transmittance estimates made by an in vivo applicable autofluorescence technique. Results: Human lens transmission of blue light decreases with age by 0.7-0.8% per year at 480 nm. The comparison of methods showed that the autofluorescence-based method correlated significantly with the direct measurements (R = 0.83, p <0.001) and acceptable agreement between the two methods was found. Discussion: In conclusion, the human lens transmittance of blue light can be measured reliably in vivo. This enables the possibility to correct for retinal light intensities when studying the mechanisms of the circadian rhythm in clinical studies and related disorders and in addition when working with clinical and experimental methods affected by retinal blue light intensities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalOphthalmic Research
Volume46
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)118-124
Number of pages7
ISSN0030-3747
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2011

ID: 31066535