Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Home blood pressure in pregnancy-the upper reference limit

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Self-monitoring of blood pressure during pregnancy: an observational study in the obstetrical waiting room

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Spontaneous blood pressure oscillations in mechanically ventilated patients with sepsis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. From pioneering to implementing automated blood pressure measurement in clinical practice: Thomas Pickering's legacy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Prevalence of heart failure and other risk factors among first-degree relatives of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Fatty Liver Among Adolescent Offspring of Women With Type 1 Diabetes (the EPICOM Study)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. A reduction in sedentary behaviour in obese women during pregnancy reduces neonatal adiposity: the DALI randomised controlled trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the upper home blood pressure reference limit in healthy pregnant women correspond to 135/85 mmHg as used when diagnosing white coat hypertension outside pregnancy.

METHODS: In this prospective observational study 104 healthy, singleton pregnant women with a mean age of 32 ± 4 (±SD) years and with a median pre-pregnancy body mass index of 21 (interquartile range 20-24) kg/m were included. Home blood pressure was measured with the device Microlife® BP 3A Plus twice daily for three days (18 measurements in total) in addition to routine office blood pressure measurements in early (median 12+1 (weeks+days)), mid (20+0) and late pregnancy (35+3). Upper blood pressure reference limits were calculated as mean +2 SD.

RESULTS: Office blood pressure versus home blood pressure were 115 ± 11/72 ± 7 versus 103 ± 7/64 ± 5 mmHg in early pregnancy, 112 ± 11/74 ± 7 versus 102 ± 7/63 ± 5 mmHg in mid pregnancy and 118 ± 11/75 ± 8 versus 107 ± 8/66 ± 6 mmHg in late pregnancy. The mean difference between office blood pressure and home blood pressure was 10 mmHg. In late pregnancy, the upper reference limit was 140/91 mmHg for office blood pressure and 123/78 mmHg for home blood pressure with slightly lower values in early and mid pregnancy, respectively.

CONCLUSION: In late pregnancy, the upper home blood pressure reference limit in a population of healthy women was 123/78 mmHg. This value questions the generally proposed level of 135/85 mmHg to define white coat hypertension in pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBlood Pressure Monitoring
Volume24
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
ISSN1359-5237
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

ID: 57290818