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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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High-sensitive C-reactive protein and homocysteine levels in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder, their first-degree relatives and healthy control persons - results from a clinical study

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  • Marc Østergaard Nielsen
  • Nanna Aagaard Petersen
  • Klara Coello
  • Sharleny Stanislaus
  • Sigurd A Melbye
  • Hanne Lie Kjærstad
  • Kimie Stefanie Ormstrup Sletved
  • Ruth Frikke-Schmidt
  • Roger S McIntyre
  • Maj Vinberg
  • Lars Vedel Kessing
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BACKGROUND: Changes in inflammatory and metabolic markers are implicated in the pathogenesis in both the development and progression of bipolar disorder (BD). Notwithstanding, these markers have not been investigated in newly diagnosed BD.

METHODS: We compared high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and homocysteine (Hcy) levels in 372 patients with newly diagnosed BD, 106 unaffected first-degree relatives (URs), and 201 healthy control persons (HCs). Within the patient group, we also investigated possible associations between hs-CRP and Hcy, respectively, with illness-related characteristics and psychotropic medication.

RESULTS: No statistically significant differences in Hcy and hs-CRP levels were found when comparing BD and URs with HCs. Similarly, there were no differences when comparing only patients in remission or patients with affective symptoms, respectively, with HCs. Hcy levels were found to be 11.9% (95% CI: 1.030-1.219) higher in patients with BD when compared with their URs (p = 0.008), when adjusting for folate and cobalamin status, age, sex, and self-reported activity levels. Hcy levels were significantly associated with folate, cobalamin, gender, and age in all models (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Our results do not support hs-CRP or Hcy as markers in newly diagnosed BD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
Volume63
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)e103
ISSN0924-9338
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 2020

ID: 61339516