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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Family Formation and Socio-Economic Status among 35-Year-Old Men Who Have Survived Cancer in Childhood and Early Adulthood: A Register-Based Cohort Study

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INTRODUCTION: The number of children and young adults who survive cancer has steadily increased over the past decades. Consequently, life circumstances after cancer have gained increasing importance. The aim of this study was to explore family formation and socio-economic status among 35-year-old men having survived cancer in childhood or early adulthood compared to an age-matched comparison group.

METHODS: This study is a national, register-based cohort study among 35-year-old men. Men diagnosed with cancer in childhood and early adulthood were registered between 1978 and 2016. At the time of diagnosis, each patient was randomly matched with 150 men without cancer from the background population within the same birth year. Those still alive at the age of 35 years were included in the study population.

RESULTS: The study population consisted of 4,222 men diagnosed with cancer in childhood or early adulthood and 794,589 men in the age-matched comparison group. Men who have survived cancer during childhood or early adulthood have a reduced probability of having children, and lower probability of getting married or of cohabitation than those from an age-matched comparison group. Men who have survived CNS cancer also have a lower probability of having a higher education than high school and a higher probability of being outside the workforce than those from an age-matched comparison group.

DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Many men who have survived cancer during childhood or early adulthood are influenced by their cancer later in life, which was apparent in family formation, educational achievements, and labour market attachment. Continued focus on rehabilitation and needs for support among the male survivors of childhood and youth cancer is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOncology research and treatment
Volume45
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)102-111
Number of pages10
ISSN2296-5270
Publication statusPublished - 2022

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© 2021 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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