Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Cross-Over Study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Multiple Fractures and Impaired Bone Fracture Healing in a Patient with Pycnodysostosis and Hypophosphatasia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Bone Mass Development in Childhood and Its Association with Physical Activity and Vitamin D Levels. The CHAMPS-Study DK

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Blood Pressure in Healthy Youngsters is modified by Vitamin-D Supplementation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in youngsters by vitamin-D supplementation

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Oxygen conserving mitochondrial adaptations in the skeletal muscles of breath hold divers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Heat-washout measurements compared to distal blood pressure and perfusion in orthopaedic patients with foot ulcers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Physical exercise associated with improved BMD independently of sex and vitamin D levels in young adults

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome of the study was 24-h renal calcium excretion that is considered a proxy measure of the amount of calcium absorbed from the intestine. We studied 125 healthy men and women, aged 34 (25-45) years on two separate days. On each day, a light breakfast was served together with 500 ml of semi-skimmed milk to which either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio was significantly increased (17 %) compared with placebo. Stratification by daily calcium intake showed effect of chymosin in participant with a habitual intake above the median (>1,050 mg/day) in whom both urinary calcium and calcium/creatinine ratio were significantly increased compared with placebo. Effects did not depend on plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Chymosin added to milk increases renal calcium excretion in the hours following intake without affecting plasma levels of calcium or calciotropic hormones. The effect most likely represents enhanced intestinal calcium absorption shortly after intake. Further studies are warranted on whether intake of milk-added chymosin may cause beneficial effects on bone. www.ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT01370941.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCalcified Tissue International
Volume96
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)105-112
ISSN0171-967X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

February 2015, Volume 96, Issue 2, pp 105-112

ID: 44881691