Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Effect of motion artifacts and their correction on near-infrared spectroscopy oscillation data: a study in healthy subjects and stroke patients

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Quantifying cerebral hypoxia by near-infrared spectroscopy tissue oximetry: the role of arterial-to-venous blood volume ratio

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Precision of coherence analysis to detect cerebral autoregulation by near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm infants

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. The chronobiology of migraine: a systematic review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. PEARL study protocol: a real-world study of fremanezumab effectiveness in patients with chronic or episodic migraine

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Workforce Attachment after Ischemic Stroke – The Importance of Time to Thrombolytic Therapy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is prone to contamination by motion artifacts (MAs). Motion correction algorithms have previously been proposed and their respective performance compared for evoked rain activation studies. We study instead the effect of MAs on "oscillation" data which is at the basis of functional connectivity and autoregulation studies. We use as our metric of interest the interhemispheric correlation (IHC), the correlation coefficient between symmetrical time series of oxyhemoglobin oscillations. We show that increased motion content results in a decreased IHC. Using a set of motion-free data on which we add real MAs, we find that the best motion correction approach consists of discarding the segments of MAs following a careful approach to minimize the contamination due to band-pass filtering of data from "bad" segments spreading into adjacent "good" segments. Finally, we compare the IHC in a stroke group and in a healthy group that we artificially contaminated with the MA content of the stroke group, in order to avoid the confounding effect of increased motion incidence in the stroke patients. After motion correction, the IHC remains lower in the stroke group in the frequency band around 0.1 and 0.04 Hz, suggesting a physiological origin for the difference. We emphasize the importance of considering MAs as a confounding factor in oscillation-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy studies.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume20
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)56011
ISSN1083-3668
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

ID: 45514723