Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Early-onset pneumonia following bag-mask ventilation versus endotracheal intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A substudy of the CAAM trial

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Prognosis of myocardial infarction-related cardiogenic shock according to preadmission out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Randomized blinded trial of automated REBOA during CPR in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The Copenhagen Tool A research tool for evaluation of Basic Life Support educational interventions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Serum GFAP and UCH-L1 for the prediction of neurological outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Criteria-based dispatch of emergency medical services in non-traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Symptoms presented during emergency telephone calls for patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Hemorrhage and saline resuscitation are associated with epigenetic and proteomic reprogramming in the rat lung

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Supplemental oxygen therapy in trauma patients: an exploratory registry-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Determining a safe upper limit of oxygen supplementation for adult patients: a systematic review

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewpeer-review

View graph of relations

Aim: Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) is a common in-hospital complication in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In this substudy of the CAAM trial, we aimed to compare whether bag mask ventilation (BMV) compared to endotracheal intubation (ETI) performed during cardiopulmonary resuscitation increases the risk of developing EOP. Methods: Adult patients from the CAAM trial that survived beyond 12 h of hospitalization were included. Information about in-hospital management and outcome of study subjects was systematically collected. Our primary aim was to compare the incidence of EOP in the BMV and ETI group using a series of bivariate analysis adjusting for one variable at a time and a logistic regression controlled for survival beyond 96 h, age, gender, catecholamine administration, no flow time, and initial shockable rhythm. Results: Of 627 patients from the CAAM trial that survived to hospital admission, 409 patients were hospitalized beyond 12 h and thus included (202 randomized to BMV and 20 7 randomized to ETI). Patients in the BMV group had a significantly longer period of unsecured airway during prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (BMV (median): 33 min; ETI (median): 17 min, p < 0.0001). No significant difference in the development of EOP according to airway management was identified on univariate analysis (BMV: 53%, ETI: 53%, Odds Ratio 1.0 [0.7–1.5], p = 1.0). We found no difference in the development of EOP according to airway management in the series of bivariate analyses or in the multivariable regression analysis either. Conclusion: In this substudy of the CAAM trial, development of early-onset pneumonia in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors did not depend on airway management technique during CPR.

Original languageEnglish
JournalResuscitation
Volume154
Pages (from-to)12-18
Number of pages7
ISSN0300-9572
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2020

    Research areas

  • Airway management, Aspiration pneumonia, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Early-onset pneumonia, Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, Resuscitation

ID: 60405073