Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Early Use of Antibiotics Is Associated with a Lower Incidence of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm, Very Low Birth Weight Infants: The NEOMUNE-NeoNutriNet Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Reply

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  2. Congenital Heart Defects and the Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Fetal Heart Defects and Measures of Cerebral Size

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Impact of Early Exposure to Cefuroxime on the Composition of the Gut Microbiota in Infants Following Cesarean Delivery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Exome-Wide Rare Variant Analyses in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. How to safeguard the brain of extremely preterm infants?

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

  2. Central data monitoring in the multicentre randomised SafeBoosC-III trial - a pragmatic approach

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. The effect of early probiotic exposure on the preterm infant gut microbiome development

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Extremely Preterm Infant Admissions Within the SafeBoosC-III Consortium During the COVID-19 Lockdown

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Aerosol generation by respiratory support of neonates may be low

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

  • Yanqi Li
  • René Liang Shen
  • Adejumoke I Ayede
  • Janet Berrington
  • Frank H Bloomfield
  • Olubunmi O Busari
  • Barbara E Cormack
  • Nicholas D Embleton
  • Johannes B van Goudoever
  • Gorm Greisen
  • Zhongqian He
  • Yan Huang
  • Xiaodong Li
  • Hung-Chih Lin
  • Jiaping Mei
  • Paula P Meier
  • Chuan Nie
  • Aloka L Patel
  • Per T Sangild
  • Thomas Skeath
  • Karen Simmer
  • Signe Uhlenfeldt
  • Marita de Waard
  • Sufen Ye
  • Xuqiang Ye
  • Chunyi Zhang
  • Yanna Zhu
  • Ping Zhou
View graph of relations

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether commencement of antibiotics within 3 postnatal days in preterm, very low birth weight (VLBW; ≤1500 g) infants is associated with the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

STUDY DESIGN: Preplanned statistical analyses were done to study the association between early antibiotic treatment and later NEC development, using the NEOMUNE-NeoNutriNet cohort of VLBW infants from 13 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in 5 continents (n = 2831). NEC incidence was compared between infants who received early antibiotics and those who did not, with statistical adjustments for NICU, gestational age, birth weight, sex, delivery mode, antenatal steroid use, Apgar score, and type and initiation of enteral nutrition.

RESULTS: The incidence of NEC was 9.0% in the group of infants who did not receive early antibiotics (n = 269), compared with 3.9% in those who did receive early antibiotics (n = 2562). The incidence remained lower in the early antibiotic group after stepwise statistical adjustments for NICU (OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35-0.94, P < .05) and other potential confounders (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.12-0.47; P < .0001).

CONCLUSIONS: In this large international cohort of preterm VLBW infants, a small proportion of infants did not receive antibiotics just after birth, and these infants had a higher incidence of NEC. It is important to better understand the role of such variables as time, type, and duration of antibiotic treatment on NEC incidence, immune development, gut colonization, and antibiotic resistance in the NICU.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of pediatrics
Volume227
Pages (from-to)128-134.e2
ISSN0022-3476
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

    Research areas

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Databases, Factual, Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology, Infant, Premature, Infant, Very Low Birth Weight, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data, Male

ID: 62414206