Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Do patients need to stay in bed all day in the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit? Safety data from a non-restrictive setting

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Perisylvian epileptic network revisited

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Chronic hyponatremia - Why care? A case report

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Visual field defects after temporal lobe resection for epilepsy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Clinical experience with eslicarbazepine acetate in adults with sub-analysis of elderly

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Diagnostic yield of standard-wake and sleep EEG recordings

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Det normale EEG

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  3. EEG i epilepsiudredning

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  4. Ictal source imaging and electroclinical correlation in self-limited epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

PURPOSE: To assess whether injuries occur more often in an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) where portable EEG amplifiers are used, and where patients can freely move within a large area during the monitoring.

METHODS: Patients were monitored at the Danish Epilepsy Center, in an EMU specifically designed for this purpose, and they were under continuous surveillance by personnel dedicated to the EMU. Adverse events (AEs) - including injuries, were prospectively noted, as part of the safety policy of the hospital. Other data were retrospectively extracted from the electronic database, for a 5-year period (January 2012-December 2016).

RESULTS: 976 patients were admitted to the EMU. Falls occurred in 19 patients (1.9%) but none of them resulted in injury. Only one serious AE occurred: a patient had a convulsive status epilepticus, which did not respond to first-line treatment in the EMU and was transferred to the intensive care unit. The rate of AEs were similar or lower than previously reported by other centers, where the mobility of the patients had been restricted during monitoring.

CONCLUSION: In an EMU specially designed for this purpose, where patients are under continuous surveillance by personnel dedicated to the EMU, injuries can be avoided even when the mobility of the patients is not restricted.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSeizure
Volume49
Pages (from-to)13-16
Number of pages4
ISSN1059-1311
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Research areas

  • Accidental Falls, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Ambulatory, Monitoring, Physiologic, Patient Safety, Video Recording, Young Adult, Journal Article

ID: 52626120