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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Development of a severe mesenteric traction syndrome during major abdominal surgery is associated with increased postoperative morbidity: Secondary data analysis on prospective cohorts

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PURPOSE: MTS is elicited during open abdominal surgery and is characterized by facial flushing, hypotension, and tachycardia in response to the release of prostacyclin (PGI2) to plasma. MTS seems to affect postoperative morbidity, but data from larger cohorts are lacking. We aimed to determine the impact of severe mesenteric traction syndrome (MTS) on postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing open upper gastrointestinal surgery.

METHODS: The study was a secondary analysis of data from three cohorts (n = 137). The patients were graded for severity of MTS intraoperatively, and hemodynamic variables and blood samples for plasma 6-keto-PGF1α, a stable metabolite of PGI2, were obtained at defined time points. Postoperative morbidity was evaluated by the comprehensive complication index (CCI) and the Dindo-Clavien classification (DC).

RESULTS: Patients undergoing either esophagectomy (n = 70), gastrectomy (n = 22), liver- (n = 23), or pancreatic resection (n = 22) were included. Severe MTS was significantly associated with increased postoperative morbidity, i.e., CCI ≥ 26.2 (OR 3.06 [95% CI 1.1-6.6]; p = 0.03) and risk of severe complications, i.e., DC ≥3b (OR 3.1 [95% CI 1.2-8.2]; p = 0.023). Furthermore, patients with severe MTS had increased length of stay (OR 10.1 [95% CI 1.9-54.3]; p = 0.007) and were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (OR = 7.3 [95% CI 1.3-41.9]; p = 0.027), but there was no difference in 1-year mortality.

CONCLUSION: Occurrence of severe MTS during upper gastrointestinal surgery is associated with increased postoperative morbidity as indicated by an increased rate of severe complications, length of stay, and admission to the ICU. It remains to be determined whether inhibition of MTS enhances postoperative recovery.

Original languageEnglish
JournalLangenbecks Archives of Surgery
Volume405
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)81-90
Number of pages10
ISSN1435-2443
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

    Research areas

  • Epoprostenol, Flushing, General surgery, Hemodynamics, Mesenteric traction syndrome, Postoperative complications

ID: 58969612