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Cortical spreading depression as a site of origin for migraine: Role of CGRP

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  1. CGRP-dependent signalling pathways involved in mouse models of GTN- cilostazol- and levcromakalim-induced migraine

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  2. Naratriptan is as effective as sumatriptan for the treatment of migraine attacks when used properly. A mini-review

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  3. Poor social support and loneliness in chronic headache: Prevalence and effect modifiers

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  1. Understanding the link between obesity and headache- with focus on migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

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  2. Guide to preclinical models used to study the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

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  3. Long-term monitoring of intracranial pressure in freely-moving rats; impact of different physiological states

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  4. Preclinical update on regulation of intracranial pressure in relation to idiopathic intracranial hypertension

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PREMISE: Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder that leads to significant disability, yet remains poorly understood.

PROBLEM: One potential triggering mechanism in migraine with aura is cortical spreading depression, which can activate the trigeminal nociceptive system both peripherally and centrally in animal models. A primary neuropeptide of the trigeminal system is calcitonin gene-related peptide, which is a potent vasodilatory peptide and is currently a major therapeutic target for migraine treatment. Despite the importance of both cortical spreading depression and calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine, the relationship between these two players has been relatively unexplored. However, recent data suggest several potential vascular and neural connections between calcitonin gene-related peptide and cortical spreading depression.

CONCLUSION: This review will outline calcitonin gene-related peptide-cortical spreading depression connections and propose a model in which cortical spreading depression and calcitonin gene-related peptide act at the intersection of the vasculature and cortical neurons, and thus contribute to migraine pathophysiology.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCephalalgia : an international journal of headache
Volume39
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)428-434
Number of pages7
ISSN0333-1024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 58957069