Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Comparative efficacy of medical treatments for vernal keratoconjunctivitis in children and young adults: a systematic review with network meta-analyses

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Socio-economic status in families affected by childhood cataract

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Detection of oedema on optical coherence tomography images using deep learning model trained on noisy clinical data

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Impact of tobacco use on corneal thickness and endothelial health: a systematic review with meta-analyses

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Factors associated with ocular surface disease and severity in adults with atopic dermatitis: a nationwide survey

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Increased incidence of mental disorders in children with cataract - findings from a population-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Patients presenting with metastases: stage IV uveal melanoma, an international study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Vaginal melanoma in Denmark from 1980 to 2018: A population-based study based on genetic profile and survival

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

PURPOSE: To systematically review the literature on the treatment of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) in children and young adults and conduct comparative efficacy analysis on clinical signs and symptoms using network meta-analyses.

METHODS: We systematically searched the databases PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central and Web of Science on 21 October 2019 for randomized controlled trials (RCT). Studies considered had patients with VKC < 20 years of age randomized into either intervention (any medical intervention) or comparator (active treatment, placebo treatment or non-treatment control), where pre-defined outcomes (data from ≥2 weeks and as close as possible to 2 months) of symptoms (itching, tearing, photophobia and foreign body sensation) and signs (hyperaemia, punctate keratitis, Horner-Trantas dots and macropapillae) were reported. Risk of bias within studies was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Comparisons were made using network meta-analyses.

RESULTS: We identified 39 studies with data on 2046 individuals. Twenty-three studies were eligible for quantitative analyses. None were systemic therapy. Temporal trend analysis showed that an initial focus on topical mast cell stabilizers turned to a focus on calcineurin inhibitors and a more diverse variety of pharmacological strategies. Studies varied in population, treatment duration and quality. The quantitative analysis revealed that efficacy of different therapies differed substantially across important clinical signs and symptoms, but there was a general trend of superior efficacy when using topical corticosteroids with stronger efficacy of the more potent corticosteroids.

CONCLUSION: We provide an overview of RCTs comparing the efficacy of treatments for VKC in children and young adults, which we find differs across symptoms and signs. Overall, we saw a general trend of superior efficacy with topical corticosteroids. However, our findings highlight the need for better studies, consensus on core outcomes and potential for individualized therapy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Ophthalmologica
Volume100
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)35-44
Number of pages10
ISSN1755-375X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

© 2021 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Research areas

  • network meta-analysis, systematic review, treatment efficacy, vernal keratoconjunctivitis

ID: 69981753