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Causal relationship between slow waves of arterial, intracranial pressures and blood velocity in brain

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PURPOSE: Slow vasogenic waves in arterial blood pressure (ABP), intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (FV) carry information on multiple brain homeostatic control mechanisms. This work presents an approach to evaluate causal relation between oscillatory modes of these signals as an alternative to time or frequency domain Granger analysis.

METHODS: Forty-five patients with simultaneous recordings of ICP, ABP and FV during CSF infusion studies were examined retrospectively. Each time series was decomposed into ten intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) via Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and, afterwards, Granger causality (GC) was computed.

RESULTS: Slow waves of ICP, ABP and FV were reconstructed from mode functions IMF6-9 of each time series, covering a frequency range between 0.013 and 0.155 Hz. Most significant connections were from FV to ICP, being stronger during elevation of mean ICP during infusion study. No G-causality was found between any of the IMFs during the baseline phase.

CONCLUSION: Nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the cerebral and systemic signals can be addressed using EEMD decomposition There is a causal influence of slow waves of FV on slow waves on ICP during the plateau phase of the infusion study for a frequency band between 0.095 and 0.155 Hz. This relationship is magnified during mild intracranial hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104970
JournalComputers in Biology and Medicine
Volume139
Pages (from-to)104970
ISSN0010-4825
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

ID: 69074793