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Cardiac repolarization and depolarization in people with Type 1 diabetes with normal ejection fraction and without known heart disease: a case-control study

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Isaksen, J L ; Graff, C ; Ellervik, C ; Jensen, J S ; Rossing, P ; Kanters, J K ; Jensen, M T. / Cardiac repolarization and depolarization in people with Type 1 diabetes with normal ejection fraction and without known heart disease : a case-control study. In: Diabetic Medicine Online. 2018 ; Vol. 35, No. 10. pp. 1337-1344.

Bibtex

@article{66d4429906214c0c9d9a468a8cf08380,
title = "Cardiac repolarization and depolarization in people with Type 1 diabetes with normal ejection fraction and without known heart disease: a case-control study",
abstract = "AIMS: To investigate depolarization and repolarization durations in people with Type 1 diabetes, including the relationship to age.METHODS: 855 persons with Type 1 diabetes without known heart disease were included and matched with 1710 participants from a general population study. Clinical examinations, questionnaires and biochemistry were assessed. A 10-second 12-lead ECG was performed and analysed digitally.RESULTS: QTc was longer in people with Type 1 diabetes compared to controls (414±16 vs. 411±19 ms, P <0.001), and particularly so in young people with Type 1 diabetes. The fully adjusted increase was 13.8 ms (95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years and 3.4 ms (CI: 1.5-5.3 ms, P<0.001) at age 40 years. The rate-corrected QRSc was increased in people with Type 1 diabetes (97±11 vs. 95±11 ms, P <0.001) and was age-independent (P =0.5). JTc was increased in the young people with Type 1 diabetes (10.7 ms (CI: 5.4-16.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years), but not in older people with Type 1 diabetes (interaction age-diabetes, P <0.01).CONCLUSIONS: For people with Type 1 diabetes, cardiac depolarization is increased at all ages, whereas repolarization is increased only relatively in young people with Type 1 diabetes. Hence, young people with Type 1 diabetes may be more prone to ventricular arrhythmias. The findings contribute to the understanding of sudden cardiac death in young people with Type 1 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Isaksen, {J L} and C Graff and C Ellervik and Jensen, {J S} and P Rossing and Kanters, {J K} and Jensen, {M T}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/dme.13689",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1337--1344",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine Online",
issn = "1464-5491",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cardiac repolarization and depolarization in people with Type 1 diabetes with normal ejection fraction and without known heart disease

T2 - a case-control study

AU - Isaksen, J L

AU - Graff, C

AU - Ellervik, C

AU - Jensen, J S

AU - Rossing, P

AU - Kanters, J K

AU - Jensen, M T

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - AIMS: To investigate depolarization and repolarization durations in people with Type 1 diabetes, including the relationship to age.METHODS: 855 persons with Type 1 diabetes without known heart disease were included and matched with 1710 participants from a general population study. Clinical examinations, questionnaires and biochemistry were assessed. A 10-second 12-lead ECG was performed and analysed digitally.RESULTS: QTc was longer in people with Type 1 diabetes compared to controls (414±16 vs. 411±19 ms, P <0.001), and particularly so in young people with Type 1 diabetes. The fully adjusted increase was 13.8 ms (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years and 3.4 ms (CI: 1.5-5.3 ms, P<0.001) at age 40 years. The rate-corrected QRSc was increased in people with Type 1 diabetes (97±11 vs. 95±11 ms, P <0.001) and was age-independent (P =0.5). JTc was increased in the young people with Type 1 diabetes (10.7 ms (CI: 5.4-16.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years), but not in older people with Type 1 diabetes (interaction age-diabetes, P <0.01).CONCLUSIONS: For people with Type 1 diabetes, cardiac depolarization is increased at all ages, whereas repolarization is increased only relatively in young people with Type 1 diabetes. Hence, young people with Type 1 diabetes may be more prone to ventricular arrhythmias. The findings contribute to the understanding of sudden cardiac death in young people with Type 1 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - AIMS: To investigate depolarization and repolarization durations in people with Type 1 diabetes, including the relationship to age.METHODS: 855 persons with Type 1 diabetes without known heart disease were included and matched with 1710 participants from a general population study. Clinical examinations, questionnaires and biochemistry were assessed. A 10-second 12-lead ECG was performed and analysed digitally.RESULTS: QTc was longer in people with Type 1 diabetes compared to controls (414±16 vs. 411±19 ms, P <0.001), and particularly so in young people with Type 1 diabetes. The fully adjusted increase was 13.8 ms (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-19.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years and 3.4 ms (CI: 1.5-5.3 ms, P<0.001) at age 40 years. The rate-corrected QRSc was increased in people with Type 1 diabetes (97±11 vs. 95±11 ms, P <0.001) and was age-independent (P =0.5). JTc was increased in the young people with Type 1 diabetes (10.7 ms (CI: 5.4-16.0 ms, P <0.001) at age 20 years), but not in older people with Type 1 diabetes (interaction age-diabetes, P <0.01).CONCLUSIONS: For people with Type 1 diabetes, cardiac depolarization is increased at all ages, whereas repolarization is increased only relatively in young people with Type 1 diabetes. Hence, young people with Type 1 diabetes may be more prone to ventricular arrhythmias. The findings contribute to the understanding of sudden cardiac death in young people with Type 1 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/dme.13689

DO - 10.1111/dme.13689

M3 - Journal article

VL - 35

SP - 1337

EP - 1344

JO - Diabetic Medicine Online

JF - Diabetic Medicine Online

SN - 1464-5491

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 53971138