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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor: epigenetic regulation in psychiatric disorders

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  1. Transcriptomic profiling of trigeminal nucleus caudalis and spinal cord dorsal horn

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  2. DNMT1 regulates expression of MHC class i in post-mitotic neurons

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  3. Localization of CGRP, CGRP receptor, PACAP and glutamate in trigeminal ganglion. Relation to the blood-brain barrier

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  1. Structural and sequence variants in patients with Silver-Russell syndrome or similar features-Curation of a disease database

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  2. The neurobiology of social deficits in female patients with borderline personality disorder: The importance of oxytocin

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  3. Feasibilty study on the use of methylation-specific MLPA for the 11p15 region on prenatal samples

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Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are currently being investigated in animal models and clinical studies. However, very little is currently known about the mechanisms that deregulate BDNF gene expression in these disorders. The BDNF gene structure and tissue expression pattern is complex, controlled in humans by 9 different gene promoters. Recently, epigenetic changes at the BDNF gene locus have been proposed to provide a link between gene and environment. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of BDNF epigenetic regulation with respect to psychiatric disorders and describe how this information can be applied in therapy and future research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBrain Research
Volume1586
Pages (from-to)162-72
Number of pages11
ISSN0006-8993
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Oct 2014

    Research areas

  • Animals, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Epigenesis, Genetic, Humans, Mental Disorders

ID: 45888801